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Keuka College News

College Receives $250,000 from New York State to Help Fund Center for Business Analytics and Health Informatics

Keuka College has received $250,000 from New York State to fund a project aimed at boosting the economic profile of Yates County.

The Empire State Development (ESD) grant will help fund the Center for Business Analytics and Health Informatics, which will be housed in a new building. Construction of the facility is expected to start in spring 2015.

The funding was included in the $80.7 million awarded to the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council (FLREDC) at a ceremony yesterday (Dec. 11) in Albany. The awards culminated the fourth annual New York State Regional Economic Development Councils competition in which 10 regional councils across the state vied for a piece of $750 million in grants and tax breaks.

Prof. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, Ph.D.

“I am pleased that the FLREDC and ESD saw the value of the Center for Business Analytics and Health Informatics (CBAHI), especially the impact it will have on Yates County,” said Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, president of Keuka College. “The Center will create jobs and become the hub for entrepreneurial programs and research in Yates County.”

The Center for Business Analytics and Health Informatics will leverage Keuka College’s entrepreneurial business programs to boost the economy of Yates County—New York State’s most economically challenged region—by creating construction, high-tech, health sciences, and education jobs,” said Díaz-Herrera.

“The academic programs, workshops, symposia and development of analytical capabilities that the CBAHI will promote will be vital components of our student’s education,” said Dr. Dan Robeson, founding director of the Center for Business Analytics and Health Informatics, chair of the Division of Business and Management and associate professor of management. “The CBAHI places Keuka College among the first movers in higher education in this new and dynamic field.”

“The Center will also leverage the College’s expertise in healthcare—in particular nursing and occupational therapy—to address the nursing shortage faced by Yates County and other rural regions across the country,” said Díaz-Herrera.

In addition, the president said health care providers in Yates County will receive state-of-the-art training in informatics.

“This is important because achieving meaningful use of electronic health records depends on the capacity of providers to effectively exchange data through interoperable systems while safeguarding the integrity, privacy, and security of patient information,” he explained.“The training provided by the Center, to nurses and others pursuing careers in healthcare, will help Yates County retain these talented workers, thereby ensuring a high-level of healthcare in the future.”

Keuka College students will also reap benefits because the Center will provide hands-on, experiential learning opportunities, a staple of a Keuka College education and a key to finding success in the job market and graduate school.

The Center will anchor a new college-town development (Keuka Commons)—called for in the College’s Long Range Strategic Plan—that will serve myriad needs of students and community residents. Early planning calls for a fitness center, stores, and eateries.

The ESD grant comes six months after the College earned START-UP designation, an initiative designed to provide major incentives for businesses to relocate, start up, or expand in New York State through affiliations with colleges and universities.

More than 2,500 square feet of vacant space at Keuka Business Park in Penn Yan was declared eligible for the START-UP program and the College is working with the Finger Lakes Economic Development Center to secure businesses for that location. The College also hopes to designate space in the Keuka Commons building for the START-UP NY initiative.

A centerpiece of the Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s strategy to jump-start the Empire State economy, the regional councils were established in 2011. The first three rounds of the regional council process awarded more than $2 billion to more than 2,200 job creation and community projects, supporting the creation and retention of more than 130,000 jobs.

Keuka College President Attending White House Event Today to Discuss College Attainment and Access

Keukonians and friends of the College are asked to show their support for college attainment and access on social media today with #CollegeOpportunity.

Prof. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, Ph.D.

Keuka College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, along with a select number of other invited college presidents and higher education leaders, will today (Dec. 4) join President Obama, the First Lady, and Vice President Biden to announce new actions to help more students prepare for and graduate from college.

The White House College Opportunity Day of Action helps to support President Obama’s commitment to partner with colleges and universities, business leaders, and nonprofits to support students across the country to help our nation reach its goal of leading the world in college attainment.

The summit—which will include remarks from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, President Obama, the First Lady, and Vice President Biden—begins at 9 a.m. and will be available for live streaming.

Participants invited to the White House will commit to new action in one of four areas: improving degree completion, creating partnerships that encourage college-going, training high school counselors as part of the First Lady’s Reach Higher initiative, and increasing the number of college graduates in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

As a member of the Yes We Must Coalition, Keuka College has made its commitment to making the dream of achieving a higher education a reality for more students than ever before.

“Everyone, certainly society as a whole, benefits from greater access to higher education. To maintain America’s leadership role and continue our long history of technological innovation, a college education must be available to all who are willing to achieve one,” said Díaz-Herrera.

The Yes We Must Coalition is a three-year-old organization of small, non-profit, private colleges and universities where 50 percent or more of each campus’ undergraduate enrollment is eligible for federal Pell grants to assist with the cost of college. The coalition’s purpose is to share resources, information, and promising practices to improve the success of low-income and first generation students as well as to be a voice for students in the policy arena.

Expanding opportunity for more students to enroll and succeed in college is vital to building a strong economy and a strong middle class. According to the White House, today only 9 percent of those born in the lowest family income quartile attain a bachelor’s degree by age 25, compared to 54 percent in the top quartile.

“A liberal arts-based education is the most powerful tool one has when it comes to advancing socioeconomic status,” said Díaz-Herrera. “Twelve U.S. presidents, six U.S. Supreme Court chief justices, and more than 50 percent of today’s Fortune 500 CEOs have a liberal arts education. As a liberal arts institution, Keuka College is preparing the next generation of citizens and leaders to serve the nation and the world of the 21st century.”

Keuka College’s Digital Learning at Keuka College (DL@KC) initiative is a revolutionary combination of digital learning, the liberal arts, and hands-on experience in professional practice. This fall, the College introduced the new Digital Studies minor, designed to give students in any field practical, real-world, and useful experience with analytics, big data analysis, digital storytelling, and coding.

“Leading the world in college attainment is a lofty goal for the future, and Keuka College is doing its part by creating and implementing forward-thinking curricula that will ensure our graduates are poised for success in the 21st century’s global, technology-driven economy,” said Díaz-Herrera.

Keuka College’s MSM Program Ranked in the Top 50 by The Financial Engineer

Keuka College is proud to announce that our master of science in management (MSM) program has been ranked among the top 50 MSM programs by The Financial Engineer. The College would like to congratulate the faculty and staff whose dedication to delivering the best academic program possible has resulted in this honor.

Read more about this great program click here.

To see the rankings click here.

 

Curriculum vs. Syllabus

Mary Saracino speaking at the seminar on program design and curriculum writing

Through a partnership with the International School at Vietnam National University (VNU) in Hanoi, Vietnam, more than 30 lecturers at the school recently participated in a seminar on program design and curriculum writing.

The keynote speakers of the seminar were Mary Saracino, lecturer for Keuka College at VNU, and Dr. Nguyen Hai Thanh, vice rector and associate professor of the International School.

The seminar was held to implement curriculum completion in accordance with standard outcomes of graduate programs with degrees granted by VNU. During the seminar, Saracino and Dr. Thanh discussed the appropriate method to write the standard outcomes for curricula of different majors in line with Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain; rationales for selecting required cognitive levels in the standard outcomes of the programs; and various subjects to generate the connection and consistency in the programs of International School.

Bloom’s taxonomy is a way of distinguishing the fundamental questions within the education system. It refers to a classification of the different learning objectives that educators set for students. It divides educational objectives into three domains: cognitive, affective, and psychomotor—sometimes described as “knowing/head,” “feeling/heart,” and “doing/hands,” respectively.

Within the domains, learning at the higher levels is dependent on having attained prerequisite knowledge and skills at lower levels. A goal of Bloom’s taxonomy is to motivate educators to focus on all three domains, creating a more holistic form of education.

Throughout November and December, lecturers at the International School will organize other seminars to guide students carrying out and reporting research and scientific studies conducted by International School teaching and training staff.

Epic-making Change without Conflict

By Professor of History Dr. Sander Diamond

Epic-making change rarely comes without conflict. Such was not the case 25 years ago this month when the Berlin Wall opened.

Some people approached 1989 with consternation, subscribing to the vision held out by George Orwell in his bestseller, 1984. In truth, what happened Nov. 9, 1989, set in motion a train of events that would have caught Orwell short. It is a day when nearly all of the legacies of the 20th century began to dissolve, literally overnight, and without conflict.

On that fateful day, one may say that the Cold War ended, the German Question was put to rest with the reunification of the two Germanys the following October and the re-establishment of a long-divided Berlin as its capital, the retreat of the Red Army from Central and Eastern Europe, the creation of democratic nations in place of communist ones, the unimaginable collapse of the Soviet Union in December 1991 and soon its dismemberment into independent states, and China, drawing lessons from the fate of the USSR, emerging into an economic giant leaving its communist political leadership intact. Just as the outbreak of World War I marked the end of an age, so did the opening of the Berlin Wall.

The history of the Berlin Wall began in 1945 when a defeated Germany was divided into Four Zones of Occupation: one each to the British, French, Americans, and Russians. In 1949, the French, British, and American zones were collapsed into the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany). In turn, the Russians created the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). Berlin was also divided into four zones and on Aug. 13, 1961, Berliners awakened to find a wall of separation being built and soon it divided the city in two, a small version of the Iron Curtain. Escape was nearly impossible from the Eastern sector. The western occupiers protested; there was talk of war, but soon the Berlin Wall became a fact of life.

However, in the mid-1980s, internal changes in Moscow—with the advent of Mikhail Gorbachev and his policy of Glasnost— set into motion an unexpected tidal wave of changes helped along by the election of a Polish-born Pope and Ronald Reagan’s more aggressive foreign policy. In the late 1980s, the winds of change swept into the shipyards of Gdansk, the former city of Danzig, Hitler’s casus belli for war in 1939; into Budapest; and in 1989, the Lutheran churches of East Germany. In short order, the Houses that Stalin Built in the wake of World War II started to waver on their foundations and the GDR fell off its pedestal. With the Old Guard gone, the GDR’s guards stepped aside as people with pick axes chipped away at the hated wall Nov. 9.

The end of the Berlin Wall opened the path to rebuild a divided nation. Today, Germany is an economic giant and Berlin is again a world-class city with its museums, theaters, off-beat sections, and rebuilt Parliament— the old Reichstag with its glass dome as a symbol of its new transparency.Rarely has a transition from one period to another gone so smoothly.

Only a small section of the Berlin Wall still stands, a tourist attraction, while a bronze line in the pavement reveals where the entire wall stood.

Nearby this last piece of the wall are the former Luftwaffe  headquarters; the Brandenburg Gate, a symbol of the Prussians who unified Germany in 1870; the newly built Memorial to the Six Million Murdered Jews of Europe; a memorial to those killed trying to flee East Germany; and below the surface, the Fȕhrerbunker, where Hitler committed suicide.

While unity permitted Germany to move on, it will never escape its past.