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Keuka College News

New Video Game has Keuka College Connection

When you combine a train, a birthday party, and a cast of characters who may or may not help you on your journey into the unknown, you get The Charnal House Trilogy, the latest video game from Owl Cave Games.

And the trilogy, comprised of Inhale, Sepulchure, and Exhale, has a Keuka College connection. Kelsey R. Marquart ’12 is a voice actor in two of the games, Inhale and Exhale. In Inhale, Marquart portrays the answering machine of the main character, Alex. For Exhale, she voices Carli, a minor villain.

“I like playing video games and villains, so this was a great way to combine some of my interests,” said Marquart. “I always wanted to be a voice actor in some way. A couple of years ago, I took a one-night voice-acting class at Cayuga Community College, and I was able to put what I learned into the games.”

She also credits Mark Wenderlich, professor of theatre, for boosting her aplomb and encouraging her as she was active in the College’s theatrical productions.

Kelsey R. Marquart

“While I was the stage manager for most of the plays, I helped with stage readings, was in a couple of on-campus movies, performed in one Keuka College production, and was in a play at Auburn Community Theatre,” said Marquart. “Mark gave me the confidence to get on stage—he’s amazing.”

And she can also thank a popular form of social media for helping her land her first voice-acting roles.

“I became friends with the game developer, Ashton Raze, after following her on Twitter,” said Marquart, who recorded her lines via her computer’s webcam. “She released Sepulchre first as a free stand-alone game in September 2013 and then the trilogy as a whole was recently released. She asked if I would voice characters in Inhale and Exhale. I received the script and read the whole thing so that I could figure out how to record my lines.”

For example, for the answering machine, Marquart tried to get the “human-ness” out of her voice. Marquart described Carli like a character out of Mean Girls.

According to Marquart, “the games are point-and-click style adventure games, in the same vein as King’s Quest and Monkey Island. The art is also in the same style.”

Kelsey R. Marquart '12 voices Carli, shown far right, in the new video game The Charnel House Trilogy

“The games are interactive horror-mystery and players must figure out the nature of the world in the game,” said Marquart. “The story is driven by exploration, and you must solve puzzles along the way. For example, if you need to get into a door but it’s locked, you need to figure out what to do or where to go in order to get the key to that door.”

For those interested in giving the game a whirl, here’s a brief synopsis:

Sepulchre casts you in the role of Dr. Harold Lang as you piece together his memory and navigate his fateful journey into the unknown. Find out how some strange characters are connected in this unsettling take on trains, historians, and huge bags.

In Inhale, you play as Alex, who is celebrating her birthday on the train. She is waiting impatiently for an urgent delivery—one that will change her life. Haunted by snatches of a past she can barely face, Alex longs to escape her room, her apartment, and her life. Discover the part she plays on the ominous train journey.

Alex wakes up in a familiar location after a with tragedy in Exhale. Join her in her desperate search to find the doctor she met and travel to the mysterious island of Augur Peak. Can she survive the journey? Why does she want to escape? And what is the dark and terrible secret from her past that doesn’t seem to want to stay hidden?

Marquart also serves as the editor-in-chief of the gaming and geek culture site Nerdy But Flirty, and is a member of the StreamFriends livestreaming group.

To purchase the game, log onto http://store.steampowered.com

In Praise of Art: the Power of Belief

This spring’s senior art show at Keuka College will feature the works of four seniors, each accomplished artists in their own rights and each with their own signature style.

Their joint exhibit, “Underneath It All,” will be featured in Lightner Gallery in the Lightner Library at Keuka College from April 20 – May 15. An artists’ reception, where light refreshments will be served, will be held Thursday, April 23, from 4:30-6 p.m.


Within the show are four separate themes conveying the work of each student artist. Potsdam resident Kaycee Maguire’s segment, “Ode to Spring,” features patterned designs created by the lacrosse midfielder who is completing a minor in graphic design and marketing. Horseheads resident Danielle Alred created a series of movie posters depicting the hidden, inner world where people can battle any of the seven deadly sins, while appearing otherwise fine on the outside in her works, “7 Deadly.” Dundee resident Jesse Ninos is going big with his larger-than-life mixed media and graphic design with an art noveau style in “We are Dragons.” Meanwhile, Interlaken resident Megan Chase uses watercolor paint, black india ink and fabrics to showcase women “Breaking the Boundaries” of traditional standards of beauty.

"Confinement" by Megan Chase

“I see women as snowflakes— while there are millions, there are no two who are exactly alike. Our differences as human beings should be praised rather than shamed,” Chase offered as explanation for her presented works.

In her four years on campus, Chase said she was able to explore many different mediums and styles of art as well as writing (she’s passionate about both) and will graduate with a diverse skill set, thanks to her visual and verbal art degree. After a digital photography course followed by a Foundations of Art course during her freshman year, Chase said she chose to switch her major from English to visual and verbal art.

“I am leaving Keuka College with a lot more than just an art degree, I’m leaving with communication skills that can be applied to all other aspects in life as well as a career. The program here has really allowed me to find and pursue my passions in life and I believe it allows all art majors to do so,” Chase said.

"Spring Circle" design by Kaycee Maguire

For Maguire, Keuka College offers a “ton of resources,” she said, counting Melissa Newcomb, assistant professor of art, among them. “Ms. Newcomb is a great advisor who always pushes students to strive for the best,” Maguire said.

“Graduating as one of the first few with an art & design major is awesome,” Maguire added, referring to the major the College introduced in 2013. “I have a ton of experience in a variety of fields. This program is headed in a great direction.”

And it’s preparing graduates for success too, as evidenced by the job offer Danielle Alred of Horseheads already received, to join the Elmira Jackals hockey team as its art director after graduation. Alred conducted a Field Period™ study with the Jackals in January, providing graphic design support for the East Coast Hockey (ECHL) minor league team, producing designs for their website, Jumbo-Tron and outdoor billboards, as well as social media. She credits her ability to stand out to the Jackals and others because of the handful of art classes she began taking each year after discovering a passion for graphic design in her sophomore year.

One of Danielle Alred's "7 Deadly" designs

“As soon as I stepped foot into that design class I fell in love with art, which led to my student-initiated minor in digital design. Having a minor in digital design and having the skills in various Adobe design programs has helped me to stand out on campus as well as at Field Period™ sites. Being in the art program has led to a variety of different opportunities that honed my skills in not only graphic design but in a variety of different art forms,” the organizational communication major said.

Ninos too, can boast enhanced skills through his Keuka College training, having produced works in mediums that span everything from spray-painted street art, caricatures, sculpture, comics-style art and graphic design. Describing himself as “infatuated” with mixed media, Ninos has begun to focus on fantasy-themed works evocative of his artistic idols Alan Lee (illustrator of Lord of the Rings), Mary Doodles of YouTube fame, and various DC, Marvel and Wildcats comic-book artists.

Ninos's work, "Troll"

“I have learned that I love capturing the element of movement, with strong lines, the essence of an organic object or the gesture of a figure drawing coming alive on the page,” Ninos said, adding that his best work often consumes eight hours or more.

Ninos said he enjoys creating art that can serve “as a strong narrative element in storytelling.” Given his love of movement, expression and emotion in art, he is pursuing further study and has applied to graduate art programs at SUNY Oswego and Alfred University.

"Winter Circle" design by Kaycee Maguire

Newcomb praised the seniors for preparing unique works reflecting different life values, beliefs, interests or personal identification with the world, and in doing so in a short two-and-a-half months time.

“Each one has a strong presence, and powerful statement built through layers of meaning,” Newcomb said. “They are leaving a strong impression on the future of the Art & Design program.”

Magna Carta Focus of Law Day

Craig Doran, Ontario Supreme and County Court judge and supervising Family Court judge for the 7th Judicial District will headline Keuka College’s Law Day event Monday, April 27.

Doran will discuss “Magna Carta: Symbol of Freedom Under Law” at 6:30 p.m. in Jephson Hall room 104. Sponsored by Keuka College’s Criminology/Criminal Justice Club, the presentation is free and open to the public.

The Magna Carta, a seminal document in legal and political history, was first drafted in 1215 by the Archbishop of Canterbury to make peace between the unpopular King John of England and a group of rebel barons. It promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown.

The principles embodied in the Magna Carta were incorporated into our nation’s most cherished founding documents—including the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

Judge Doran was first elected in November of 1999 and re-elected in November 2009 as Ontario County Court Judge, where he presides over County Court and Family Court. He has been designated by the New York State Chief Administrative Judge as a full-time acting Supreme Court justice, where he presides over a variety of civil matters.

In 2011, Judge Doran was appointed administrative judge of the Seventh Judicial District, making him chief supervising judge of all of the Courts serving the approximately 1.5 million people in the eight counties of the Seventh Judicial District.

An annual event, Law Day was created in 1957 when Charles Rhynes, then-American Bar Association president, envisioned a special national day to mark our commitment to the rule of law. The following year, President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the first Law Day. It was made official in 1961 when Congress issued a joint resolution designating May 1 as Law Day.

Fulbright Scholar to Lecture on Campus April 27 -28

Keuka College will welcome a visiting scholar from Nigeria to campus April 27 and 28, thanks to the Fulbright Visiting Scholar Outreach Lecturing Fund (OLF). A senior lecturer in engineering at Nnamdi Azikiwe Unversity in Awka, Nigeria, Dr. Matthew Menkiti is currently conducting research at Texas Tech University as a Fulbright visiting scholar.

Visiting Fulbright Scholar Dr. Matthew Menkiti

Dr. Menkiti will speak twice during his campus visit. His first lecture, entitled Petroleum Produced Water Treatment Processes and Management,” will focus on the utilization of novel plant and animal extracts as active treatment agents and will be held from 4 – 5:30 p.m. in Hegeman Hall, Room 109. In his second talk, entitled “Republican Democracy in the Traditional ‘Igbo Nation’ of Nigeria,” he will focus on his home culture. That lecture will focusing on the evolution and influence of Europeanization from the colonial to post-colonial era, and will be held from 1-2:30 p.m. in the Brezinsky Room of Dahlstrom Student Center. Both lectures are free and open to the public.

Since 1946, the federally-funded international educational exchange program has been operating and is considered an important diplomatic tool, building relationships between American academics, policy experts, and students and their foreign counterparts. Each year, some 800 faculty and professionals from around the world receive highly competitive Fulbright Scholar grants to travel to higher education institutions to conduct advanced research and lecture at other universities on their research specialties and the history and culture of their home countries. American faculty can also apply for competitive grants to travel abroad for research or teaching opportunities, while students can apply for international exchange study.

Through the Fulbright Scholar Program, U.S. students, faculty and community members have the opportunity to exchange ideas with visiting Fulbright scholars and the foreign scholars themselves can become better acquainted with U.S. higher education, and create links between their home institutions, host institutions stateside and the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES).

Dr. Angela Narasimhan

According to Dr. Angela Narasimhan, assistant professor of political science, this is the first time Keuka College has welcomed a Fulbright scholar as a visiting lecturer, and it’s the beginning of what she hopes will be many new academic advantages for the College, its faculty and students.

For example, the College could apply to host a Fulbright visiting scholar on campus for a year, and Narasimhan is particularly excited about the possibility of hosting foreign language tutors who could teach new languages to Keuka College students. Meanwhile, Keuka College faculty could apply for Fulbright scholarships to teach abroad or conduct research.

“I’ve always dreamed of doing a Fulbright [scholarship] to go back to Romania where I did my undergraduate degree and teach there, maybe for a semester or a year,” Narasimhan said.

Dr. Wendy Gaylord

Among the campus community, Dr. Wendy Gaylord, dean of the Keuka China Program (KCP), in which Chinese students at four partner schools overseas receive Keuka College degrees, received a Fulbright Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) award in 2002-03 to conduct research for her dissertation in Indonesia. She gave the program high praise, saying that “the Fulbright community was a wonderful group of doctoral students doing dissertation research in various fields, professors teaching or doing research and [foreign] scholars going to the U.S. for study or research or teaching.”

No matter what opportunities may be sought from the Fulbright program in the future, Narasimhan said that the first step is to host someone internationally recognized and distinguished for a campus visit. Dr. Menkiti’s visit will serve as the beginning of an “active relationship” with the Fulbright Scholar program.

“We’re going to start to take advantage of the opportunities that are available,” Narasimhan said.

To that end, Narasimhan and fellow assistant professor of political science, Dr. David Pak Leon, will host an informational session on the Fulbright program from 4-5 p.m., Tuesday, April 28 in Hegeman Hall, Room 109. Narasimhan and Leon are campus representatives for the Fulbright Scholar program.

“This is part of trying to encourage global citizenship and active engagement, whether at home or abroad,” Narasimhan said.

For more information on the Fulbright Visiting Scholar program, visit online at: http://www.iie.org/fulbright.

 

Deadline for 2015 Stork Award Nominations May 15

Sandy Carlson, left, was the recipient of the 2014 Stork Award. She received a clock from Corinne Stork at the luncheon.

Keuka College’s Community Associates Board is seeking nominations for the 2015 Donald and Corinne Stork Award for Community Service.

The College established the award to recognize individuals who exemplify its historic commitment to the value and benefit of using individual initiative for the common good. It was named after the first recipients (1991) of the award, Penn Yan resident Corinne Stork and the late Donald Stork.

Nominations may be sent to Kathy Waye, executive director of alumni and family relations, c/o the Office of Alumni and Family Relations, Keuka College, 141 Central Ave., Keuka Park, N.Y., 14478 or alumni@keuka.edu by Friday, May 15.

The 2015 award will be presented Tuesday, Aug. 11, at noon in the College’s Geiser Dining Hall, Dahlstrom Student Center.