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Keuka College News > Author Archives: Gretchen Parsells

New Video Game has Keuka College Connection

When you combine a train, a birthday party, and a cast of characters who may or may not help you on your journey into the unknown, you get The Charnal House Trilogy, the latest video game from Owl Cave Games.

And the trilogy, comprised of Inhale, Sepulchure, and Exhale, has a Keuka College connection. Kelsey R. Marquart ’12 is a voice actor in two of the games, Inhale and Exhale. In Inhale, Marquart portrays the answering machine of the main character, Alex. For Exhale, she voices Carli, a minor villain.

“I like playing video games and villains, so this was a great way to combine some of my interests,” said Marquart. “I always wanted to be a voice actor in some way. A couple of years ago, I took a one-night voice-acting class at Cayuga Community College, and I was able to put what I learned into the games.”

She also credits Mark Wenderlich, professor of theatre, for boosting her aplomb and encouraging her as she was active in the College’s theatrical productions.

Kelsey R. Marquart

“While I was the stage manager for most of the plays, I helped with stage readings, was in a couple of on-campus movies, performed in one Keuka College production, and was in a play at Auburn Community Theatre,” said Marquart. “Mark gave me the confidence to get on stage—he’s amazing.”

And she can also thank a popular form of social media for helping her land her first voice-acting roles.

“I became friends with the game developer, Ashton Raze, after following her on Twitter,” said Marquart, who recorded her lines via her computer’s webcam. “She released Sepulchre first as a free stand-alone game in September 2013 and then the trilogy as a whole was recently released. She asked if I would voice characters in Inhale and Exhale. I received the script and read the whole thing so that I could figure out how to record my lines.”

For example, for the answering machine, Marquart tried to get the “human-ness” out of her voice. Marquart described Carli like a character out of Mean Girls.

According to Marquart, “the games are point-and-click style adventure games, in the same vein as King’s Quest and Monkey Island. The art is also in the same style.”

Kelsey R. Marquart '12 voices Carli, shown far right, in the new video game The Charnel House Trilogy

“The games are interactive horror-mystery and players must figure out the nature of the world in the game,” said Marquart. “The story is driven by exploration, and you must solve puzzles along the way. For example, if you need to get into a door but it’s locked, you need to figure out what to do or where to go in order to get the key to that door.”

For those interested in giving the game a whirl, here’s a brief synopsis:

Sepulchre casts you in the role of Dr. Harold Lang as you piece together his memory and navigate his fateful journey into the unknown. Find out how some strange characters are connected in this unsettling take on trains, historians, and huge bags.

In Inhale, you play as Alex, who is celebrating her birthday on the train. She is waiting impatiently for an urgent delivery—one that will change her life. Haunted by snatches of a past she can barely face, Alex longs to escape her room, her apartment, and her life. Discover the part she plays on the ominous train journey.

Alex wakes up in a familiar location after a with tragedy in Exhale. Join her in her desperate search to find the doctor she met and travel to the mysterious island of Augur Peak. Can she survive the journey? Why does she want to escape? And what is the dark and terrible secret from her past that doesn’t seem to want to stay hidden?

Marquart also serves as the editor-in-chief of the gaming and geek culture site Nerdy But Flirty, and is a member of the StreamFriends livestreaming group.

To purchase the game, log onto http://store.steampowered.com

Magna Carta Focus of Law Day

Craig Doran, Ontario Supreme and County Court judge and supervising Family Court judge for the 7th Judicial District will headline Keuka College’s Law Day event Monday, April 27.

Doran will discuss “Magna Carta: Symbol of Freedom Under Law” at 6:30 p.m. in Jephson Hall room 104. Sponsored by Keuka College’s Criminology/Criminal Justice Club, the presentation is free and open to the public.

The Magna Carta, a seminal document in legal and political history, was first drafted in 1215 by the Archbishop of Canterbury to make peace between the unpopular King John of England and a group of rebel barons. It promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown.

The principles embodied in the Magna Carta were incorporated into our nation’s most cherished founding documents—including the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

Judge Doran was first elected in November of 1999 and re-elected in November 2009 as Ontario County Court Judge, where he presides over County Court and Family Court. He has been designated by the New York State Chief Administrative Judge as a full-time acting Supreme Court justice, where he presides over a variety of civil matters.

In 2011, Judge Doran was appointed administrative judge of the Seventh Judicial District, making him chief supervising judge of all of the Courts serving the approximately 1.5 million people in the eight counties of the Seventh Judicial District.

An annual event, Law Day was created in 1957 when Charles Rhynes, then-American Bar Association president, envisioned a special national day to mark our commitment to the rule of law. The following year, President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the first Law Day. It was made official in 1961 when Congress issued a joint resolution designating May 1 as Law Day.

Deadline for 2015 Stork Award Nominations May 15

Sandy Carlson, left, was the recipient of the 2014 Stork Award. She received a clock from Corinne Stork at the luncheon.

Keuka College’s Community Associates Board is seeking nominations for the 2015 Donald and Corinne Stork Award for Community Service.

The College established the award to recognize individuals who exemplify its historic commitment to the value and benefit of using individual initiative for the common good. It was named after the first recipients (1991) of the award, Penn Yan resident Corinne Stork and the late Donald Stork.

Nominations may be sent to Kathy Waye, executive director of alumni and family relations, c/o the Office of Alumni and Family Relations, Keuka College, 141 Central Ave., Keuka Park, N.Y., 14478 or alumni@keuka.edu by Friday, May 15.

The 2015 award will be presented Tuesday, Aug. 11, at noon in the College’s Geiser Dining Hall, Dahlstrom Student Center.

Top Student, Boss Honored

Eight students were nominated for Keuka College's 2015 Student Employee of the Year, including from left: Brittany Kuhn, Tyler Redington, Savannah Fuller, Zach Ward, Sini Ngobese, Connor Delavak, and Courtney Nojeim. (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

A “pillar in the athletics department” and a “friend who changes student lives for the better” were the respective recipients of the 2015 Student Employee and Work-Study Supervisor of the Year awards at the Student Employment Awards Luncheon April 15.

Senior psychology major Connor Delavak and Co-Curricular Transcript Coordinator and Community Service Coordinator Valerie Webster were selected by two separate panels of judges.

Delavak, nominated for the award by Jeff Bray, associate director of athletics and head athletic trainer, has worked as a student athletic trainer for four years, and the longer Bray has been at Keuka College, the more increasingly selective he has become of those he chooses to hire as his work-study students.

Connor Delavak and Jeff Bray. (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

In 23 years of supervising student employees, Bray says senior Delavak ranks in his top five, touting his demeanor and sincerity for setting him apart. In fact, Bray says Delavak has become a pillar within the athletics department.

“He has a tremendous grasp on what is expected of him and the role he plays within our department,” said Bray, adding Delavak is part of the fabric of the athletic training staff and the athletic department. “It has gotten to the point that when we are scheduled to depart for a weekend road trip, I simply ask him if we are ‘all set’ and he replies with a very confident ‘yes sir.’ He truly cares about the job that he does and it shows every time he works.”

And Bray does not hesitate to say that Delavak is a “tremendous asset” to the athletics department.

“I believe there is added responsibility that comes with that,” said Bray. “Connor has always represented himself, our department, and Keuka College in a positive and professional manner. In fact, there are times that our coaches forget that he is a student and not a full time staff member.”

Added Bray: “I think we often take for granted the importance and the impact our student employees have on our campus. With Connor, he is a respected member of my staff. I feel fortunate to have played a small role in his collegiate experience.” 

The other student nominees were Tyler Redington, Brittany Kuhn, Ethan Eschler, Savannah Fuller, Courtney Nojeim, Sini Ngobese, and Zach Ward.

“All of our student employees are winners, but the eight nominees are the cream of the crop,” said Sally Daggett, human resources manager. “I thank all of the nominators who took time to nominate your student employee. It sends a powerful message to those students, as it tells of the importance of them in your lives.” 

Savannah Fuller and Valerie Webster (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

Webster was one of five work-study supervisors nominated for the award. She was nominated by occupational science major Savannah Fuller.

In the three years senior Fuller has worked in the Community Service Resource Office as a Community Service Advocate, she said Webster has pushed her to think outside of the box and find new ways to reach out to others.

“Upon accepting this job three years ago to help pay for college, I had no idea the true wealth I would gain from Valerie,” said Fuller. “Over this time we have established a strong working relationship, and she is a phenomenal work-study supervisor.”

That’s because Webster “provides each of us with appropriate guidance and leadership to help us grow and be successfully independent in our roles as a work-study students,” said Fuller. “No matter what challenges life presents Valerie with, she always given her work-study students 100 percent.”

After commencement, Fuller believes that the friendship she and Webster share, as well as the dedication to each of their communities, will last beyond her work-study position and long after her graduation from Keuka College.

Added Fuller: “The impact Valerie has had on my life, and the lives of countless other students, is invaluable and transcendent. Valerie has a way of changing student’s lives for the better. It has been an honor to work with her.”

The other supervisor nominees were John Boccacino (sports information director), Rachel Dewey (communications specialist), Carol Sackett (library circulation supervisor), and Xong Sony Yang (international student advisor).

From left: Rachel Dewey, Sony Yang, John Boccacino, Valerie Webster, and Carol Sackett. (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

“It is an honor for me to talk to you at this luncheon, as it is one of my favorite events of the year,” said Jim Blackburn, vice president of student development. “The work student employees perform is immeasurable. Keuka College employees 511 students in 814 jobs. That is the equivalent of 150,000 hours of work per year—enough for 134 additional full-time positions. So, Keuka College students do a massive amount of work.”

Each of the nominees was recognized at the luncheon by his or her nominator and presented with a gift. The names of the student and supervisor award recipients will be added to two separate plaques housed in the Center for Experiential Learning. The Student Employee of the Year plaque is hung up in the winner’s work-study location until the following year’s awards luncheon.

More photos from the 2015 Student Employee of the Year Luncheon can be found here.

Zach Ward is a ‘Fantastic’ DRIVE Student Peer Mentor

Editor’s Note: This is the eighth in a series of profiles of 2015 Student Employee of the Year nominees. The winner will be announced at a luncheon Wednesday, April 15.

Zachary Ward

A DRIVE student peer mentor’s primary role is to serve as a mentor and support individuals with developmental disabilities as they assimilate to the Keuka College environment and explore their personal goals for the future.

And according to Laurie Mault, who works in the DRIVE Peer Mentor Program, junior Zachary Ward takes his role as a DRIVE student peer mentor seriously.

Ward, an education major from LeRoy, “is ready, willing, and consistently strives to do his best,” said Mault. “One of his many strengths includes being able to work with several individuals with varying disability at one time, while staying focused on the point at hand.”

Another of Ward’s strengths is treating the DRIVE students with the respect that they deserve, added Mault.

“This is not always easy, as many of them don’t understand what respect is—and we unfortunately don’t always get respect in return,” said Mault. “Zach has a clear understanding of this and continues to treat them with compassion.”

According to Mault, Ward comes up with ideas for different, unique ways to put the needs of the students first. Sometimes, she said, the DRIVE peer mentors need to become very creative to be able to suit each of our individuals’ needs, and Ward is able to complete this task.

“He is always one step ahead and works with the individuals, and checks for understanding to make sure that they know what to do. He comes dressed for the part, and is a fantastic mentor for our DRIVE students,” said Mault. “Zach speaks to the students in a professional manner but also is sure they understand by asking questions based on the current topic.”

And Mault believes that is something that gives Ward an advantage, as he is a college student himself.

“This allows him to connect to our students on a different level,” she said. “He understands more of what their ‘college’ needs are. Zachary always strives to do his best and is consistently looking for ways to help the DRIVE students become better, like teaching them how to socialize on a better level with other college students. He has even introduced them into his ‘friend circle.’ Zach and his friends treat our individuals as equals.”

Which is what the role of a DRIVE student peer mentor is all about.