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Archive for the ‘Academic News’ Category

Keuka College to Present a Brief History of Wine Aug. 15

Few places love wine as much as the Finger Lakes region does. But have you ever wondered just how much you actually know about what you drink? The first in Keuka College’s Lectures by the Lake series will be a wine workshop held Friday, Aug. 15 from 3 – 5 p.m. in the Geiser Refectory.

 The workshop will feature a presentation by Associate Professor of Management David Romm.

Prof. Romm will tell the story of wine and what it means to us, how it’s been made, fought over, and appreciated from 4000 BCE to the present day. Prof. Romm’s presentation will be followed by a wine and cheese reception featuring musicians from the Eastman School of Music.

Prof. Romm is uniquely qualified to speak on the subject. His corporate experience spans prestigious brands and venues such as the World Trade Center in New York and the Vista International Hotel in Washington D.C.

While at the World Trade Center, Prof. Romm had sole management responsibility for 23 different food service and catering operations located in every part of the complex. His operations served a wide variety of markets, ranging from vending machines to fine-dining restaurants and employed more than 400 people, earned annual revenues in excess of $12 million and served more than 20,000 people every day.

During Prof. Romm’s tenure at the World Trade Center, he worked with Kevin Zraly, the world-famous sommelier and wine educator. Zraly was wine director at the World Trade Center’s Windows on the World, which was widely hailed as one of the highest-grossing restaurants in the U.S.

In Washington D.C., Prof. Romm organized a wine school that attracted leading California winemakers. Throughout his career, he has also served as a consultant for such organizations as Intercontinental Hotels and Resorts, Marriott Corporation, Gallop Inc., Nestle Inc. and Hilton International. Prof. Romm has presented management seminars in England, Italy, Spain and Indonesia. He has also consulted for Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, N.M. and The Omega Institute in Rhinebeck.

Prof. Romm began teaching at Keuka College in 1991 and currently teaches several courses including Food and Society, which focuses on the complex and significant role food plays in all aspects of our lives.

Tickets for the workshop are $15. Seating is limited, so advanced reservations are advised. Make checks payable to Keuka College and mail to: Office of Alumni and Family Relations, Keuka College, Keuka Park, N.Y. 14478, or reservations may be made online at events.keuka.edu. The reservation deadline is Friday, Aug. 8.

Keuka College’s new Lectures by the Lake series is designed for community members to learn about topics of regional interest from some of the College’s most revered subject-matter experts.

For more information call (315) 279-5238 or e-mail spevents@keuka.edu.

Jones Wins Scholarship for Adult Students

Juan Jones, an admissions specialist at Corning Community College (CCC) in Corning, was recently named winner of the Joint Presidential Scholarship. This partnered award from Keuka College and CCC provides a full-time CCC employee a tuition-paid degree through Keuka College’s Accelerated Studies for Adults Program (ASAP). Jones is the sixth recipient of this scholarship award, and plans to begin his education this August.

Jones currently holds an A.S. degree in humanities and social science from CCC and plans to further his education with a B.S. in organizational management from Keuka College. He first started school at the CCC Elmira campus, which used to house a Head Start program. Since then he has spent more than 20 years working with the local Elmira community. Whether it is volunteering at his local library, helping with the Chemung County Head Start program, or volunteering in the Elmira City School District. Jones looks forward to using the new skills he’ll gain by acquiring a higher education.

Kimberly Morgan, director of admissions for ASAP, said that Jones is held in such high regard “it was like he was the mayor,” and at least 20 people came to the ceremony to honor his achievement.

Embodying the ideal of service and giving back, Jones is planning on using the scholarship to better serve his community and said he was “truly honored” to receive it.

President of CCC Dr. Katherine P. Douglas, Recipient Juan Jones, President of Keuka College Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera

The B.S. in organizational management program at Keuka College features an accelerated format; students attend class one night a week and complete their degree requirements in less than two years.

Keuka College offers seven degree programs through ASAP: four bachelor’s degree programs (criminal justice systems, nursing, organizational management, and social work) and three master’s degree programs (criminal justice administration, management, and nursing). Classes are offered at some 20 locations in New York State, including Corning Community College.

For more information on ASAP, contact the Center for Professional Studies at 866-255-3852 or asap.keuka.edu.

Seeing Their Stories in Print

Look out, Harry Potter. The debut of a recent book in the fifth-grade classroom of Terry Test ’73 in Penn Yan Elementary School could be poised to rival old standbys on the summer reading list. At least if Test’s students have anything to say about it.

Dr. Joiner hands out books to fifth-graders in Penn Yan Elementary School.

Each of Test’s students received a copy of the book, “Who is Penn Yan?” Wednesday, hand-delivered by Dr. Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English at Keuka College. Late last fall, the 17 students in Joiner’s “Literature in the Wider World” course paired up with 17 fifth-graders Test and teaching partner Rebecca Morse selected from their shared class. For three weeks, College “authors” met one-on-one with schoolchildren to craft a personal story from the child’s perspective. Each three-page story – part of the final project in Joiner’s class – was bound into the special edition keepsake for all participants. Based on the buzz around the classroom, it was quite a hit.

"Maddie," right, points out a story to "Jamie," left.

Most students started by flipping through the book searching for a photo of themselves with their “author.” Or they scanned the story titles until they found the one with their name, or more specifically, the name of the character they had chosen for themselves for the story project. Then it was on with the read, until –

“Did you see mine? I still have to read yours!” exclaimed “Miranda,” jumping up from her desk and crossing the room to her friend “Charlotte,” just to point out a particular page. Similar excitement bubbled up around the room as other students eagerly pored over pages, flipping and pointing their own finds to classmates seated nearby.

Terry Test '73 asks some of the boys in her class what they learned through the book-writing project.

“It’s fun to watch them all reading so intently,” Joiner said, pausing at the desks of several girls to ask if they’d seen page 45 yet, where a stuffed monkey belonging to “Maddie” made it into the photos. 

"Riley" reads the new book.

“The story is really good – he did a really good job,” “Mikie” said of his author, junior Devon Locher, who crafted his tale of an aspiring college scientist-baseball player. “I think I want to read it a million times.”

"Allison," gets into a good read.

At another desk, “Allison” was raving over the zombie story written for her by freshman Sabrina Androvett, pointing out their photo together and praising Androvett’s “very graphic descriptions.”

“She even made it kind of funny, like putting in a detail about one of my dogs chewing on the corpse’s bones,” said Allison, alluding to the other-worldly aspects of the story.

Indeed, among the advice Test’s students gave Joiner for how to approach the project next fall with a new crop of college and elementary students was “use your imagination.”

According to Test, the College authors did great work capturing what each fifth-grader tried to describe and using that to guide the plot each child tried to present in his or her story.

“In reading these, I can hear the fifth-grade voice and I can also feel the Keuka author’s interpretation,” said Test. “It was valuable for the fifth-graders to see how stories are the outcome of ideas.”

Teacher Terry Test '73 shares in the excitement over the new book.

By crafting a story through collaboration, the project enabled each college student to learn more about Penn Yan through the eyes or imagination of each child. But beyond that, it served to highlight how literature is the doorway to community, culture, society and more – part of the overall goals for the introductory English course itself.

"Duffy" shows off the book to Kelly Dallos, vice-principal of Penn Yan Elementary School.

Peppered with story titles including “Butch’s Greatest Adventure,” “The Amazing Annabeth,” and “Miranda Saves the Day,” the book of personal stories seems poised to be saved and cherished by each of its starring characters. Hunched over his desk, poring through the pages of the story Devon Errigo wrote about him, “Rico” had big plans to share the book with his family at home.

“I’m gonna tell my parents that a kid from Keuka College made it and he gave me details and I gave him details and we put a story together,” Rico said.

Seated nearby, “Miranda” had similar enthusiasm and praise for the story written by her author, Tiffany Scott.

“I love this!” she gushed. “I love the details she put into it, and that it’s exactly the same way I wanted it to be.”

Snapshot of a Graduate: Nakita Simons ’14

Editor’s Note: Where can a Keuka College degree take you? This is the sixth in a series of snapshot profiles on members of Keuka’s Class of 2014.

Simons, left and fellow social work graduate.

Nakita Simons ’14 of Prattsburgh began a new job May 27 as a foster care caseworker for Steuben County Department of Social Services (DSS). The Prattsburgh resident first truly explored the social work field when she conducted her sophomore Field Period™ with DSS and had “a great experience,” Simons said.

The work went so well Simons applied for a high-profile BSW Child Welfare Scholarship from New York’s Social Work Education Consortium in her junior year. Winners of the scholarship are essentially guaranteed a two-year job as a child welfare caseworker with a county DSS agency and can also earn additional scholarship money for a master’s degree in social work, provided all goes well in a semester-long practicum during their senior year. Thanks to her 3.9 GPA and her record of stellar service in multiple volunteer and leadership roles outside the classroom, Simons not only landed the scholarship and job with Steuben County DSS but was named one of six student Social Workers of the Year for the Genesee Valley Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). She will be pursuing her MSW online through a program offered by Fordham University.

Simons said she found the College social work program faculty “really helped me to get the most out of my education. They were supportive and encouraging. They got to know you on a personal level and helped me to discover my passion and reach the goals I set for myself.”

To explore what might be in your future with a Keuka College degree, request more information.

Snapshot of a Graduate: Mike Kelly ’14

Editor’s Note: Where can a Keuka College degree take you? This is the fifth in a series of snapshot profiles on members of Keuka’s Class of 2014.

As a busy member of the campus community, Mike Kelly ’14 of Black River, N.Y. gained plenty of experience in leadership, service and special events.

During his four years at Keuka College, Kelly served as president of the College chapter of Enactus, the international non-profit which empowers students to coordinate entrepreneurial projects to improve the lives of people in need. He worked as an advertising assistant in the office of student activities, and chaired the fundraising committee for the annual Relay for Life event for the American Cancer Society during sophomore and junior years. His senior practicum was spent assisting with communications and social media for the 17th annual Celebrate Service … Celebrate Yates (CSCY) day of service event, which is a collaboration between the College and the Yates County Chamber of Commerce. In addition, Kelly served three years as a resident assistant to other students living in two residence halls.

The organizational communication major was recently accepted to Lasell College in Boston where he intends to pursue a master’s degree in communication with a concentration in integrated marketing communication. Kelly said he is looking for jobs in that area, too, so he can work while attending grad school.

Looking back, Kelly said he sees the biggest benefit of his Keuka College education is “that I am incredibly prepared for the ‘real world.’”

Kelly said he owes Dr. Anita Chirco, professor of communication, many thanks for the one-on-one time in she gave in senior seminar class to work with each student to prepare portfolios, resumes and LinkedIn profiles.

“Not only am I confident that the things I’ve learned in my communication classes will help me professionally, they have given me personal confidence, something you cannot put a price on,” he said.

To explore what might be in your future with a Keuka College degree, request more information.