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Archive for the ‘Arts & Entertainment’ Category

Strength, Beauty, History Themes Within Senior Art Show

One senior is fascinated with her family history. Another is focused on finding beauty in any body. And yet another is fixated on beads and jewelry. This trio of artists will showcase signature works during “Mixed Media Minds,” the senior art show at Keuka College’s Lightner Gallery.

Friendship resident Emma Wolf has crafted mixed media collages of her great-grandmother’s family using a typewritten essay, old photos recreated on tracing paper, and a wash of coffee grounds and water to create a vintage look. From collage renderings of parts of the bodies of many women, Kaye Field of Torrington, Conn. has fashioned one body, with a mirror in place of the head. Meanwhile, Ayuko Sakurai of Yokohama, Japan, south of Tokyo, has crafted multiple works with colored beads, jewelry and fabrics.

Wolf's mixed media portraits of family

Each young woman is a visual and verbal art major, and all three will be on hand to greet the public at an artists reception, Thursday, April 24 from 4:30 – 6 p.m. at Lightner Gallery in Lightner Library, where light refreshments will be served. The show continues through May 16.

According to Melissa Newcomb, assistant professor of art, this exhibit features not just three unique styles, but three creative approaches to communicating an idea, emotion or experience, with each artist incorporating pieces of her life experiences

Portion of Kaye Field's "Beautiful Reflections" mixed media

According to Field, body image and the concept of beauty remains an intrinsic struggle for women everywhere and became the subject of her work, “Beautiful Reflections.” She chose to use a variety of media “to depict how no woman and no person is the same. We are all created differently and all of these differences are what make us all beautiful,” she said.

Field said the women who participated in her project came from all over the world and showed their courage and bravery by sending her photos to use as inspiration for the work.

“The mirror is a big part of this piece. Everyone should look in the mirror and be able to smile at their reflection,” Field said.

Wolf, too, could cite courage and bravery of strong women in her family history, such as her great-grandmother, Lula May, and other relatives who survived in regions of Florida where wild, untamed shores and marshes made daily life a struggle. Scattered for display below her mixed media works of Lula May as a child, and later, an aging woman, are knickknacks and small treasures: old-fashioned pocket watches, arrowheads, a large seashell, and an heirloom quilt. A 1938 sepia tint photo shows Lula May as a young mother, standing on a windblown beach, with a child at her feet. Other family members also appear in Wolf’s creations.

“I became avidly interested in their struggle for survival and how they were able to push through and move on to better things, when times got tough for them,” Wolf said. “I wasn’t quite sure what to focus my project on, but writing the essay helped me figure that out.”

Wolf with her "Family Tree" sculpture

Another prominent piece within Wolf’s “Strong Roots” exhibit is a sculpture of a tree rising out of the pages of a book. The work, “Family Tree,” serves as a visual metaphor, she said.

For Sakurai, the intricate work of beading or sculpting jewelry echoes the same multiple dimensions, colors and facets of her personal history, studying abroad beginning at age 15 and traveling to more than 10 countries. One work she will display is a handmade dress designed from egg shells and other unique materials. According to Melissa Newcomb, assistant professor of art, Sakurai has been working on the dress for over a year.

Sakurai's eggshell dress creation

“As I see something, I often find a connection between it and something I remembered [from my travel or study], which gives me a new layer of knowledge,” Sakurai said. “Different objects or ideas are connected through my interpretation. This makes my world muti-colored and multi-faceted, like a well-polished crystal and also stimulates me in combining both traditional and contemporary styles and concepts of art.”

During her January Field Period™ with a jewelry designer, Sakurai handcrafted her own unique gold necklace, and that experience ultimately led her to the Metal and Jewelry graduate program at Rochester Institute of Technology, where she will begin taking courses this fall.

Just this year, Keuka College began offering a new Art and Design program, providing more studio courses to give students opportunities to learn skills in a greater number of mediums. The increased diversity helps students build a portfolio with greater breadth, as well as develop strengths in a particular area, Newcomb said.

“In this case we have three seniors displaying work in multiple mixed mediums, which shows a range of experiences not only in their skills and abilities,” Newcomb said. “It also becomes a very personal but rewarding way to share their story, whether it relates to the past, present or future.”

Poet Laureate of Missouri to Read Here April 15


Keuka College’s Spotlight Series will continue with a reading by William Trowbridge, the Poet Laureate of Missouri, Tuesday, April 15.

Free and open to the public, the reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Gannett Room of Lightner Library.

Trowbridge holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a master’s degree in English from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a doctoral degree in English from Vanderbilt University. In April 2012, he was appointed to a two-year term as Poet Laureate of Missouri.

Trowbridge has five collections of poetry, including Ship of Fool, The Complete Book of Kong, Flickers, O Paradise, and Enter Dark Stranger; and three chapbooks including The Packing House Cantata, The Four Seasons, and The Book of Kong.  

A Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at Northwest Missouri State University, his poems have appeared in more than 30 anthologies, textbooks, and periodicals including Bouelvard, Colorado Review, Columbia, Crazyhorse, Gettysburg Review, The Georgia Review, New Letters, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Southern Review, and Tar River Poetry, among others. Two of Trowbridges’s books consist of monologues delivered by King Kong.

Among his awards include an Academy of American Poets Prize, a Pushcart Prize, a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference scholarship, a Camber Press Poetry Chapbook Award, and fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Ragdale, Yaddo, and The Anderson Center. Trowbridge served as an editor of The Laurel Review, one of the Midwest’s leading literary journals, for 18 years.

Now living in Lee’s Summit, Mo., Trowbridge teaches in the University of Nebraska low-residency MFA in writing program.

Romantic Whims A-Plenty in College Production

Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '15

A look at two couples’ recent divorces in 1906 New York City society sets the scene for The New York Idea, the spring theatrical production at Keuka College.

The farce, written by Langdon Mitchell and updated by David Auburn, depicts the comedic entanglements of divorce while mixing in one visiting English lord smitten with the city’s easy way with matrimony.

Directed by Professor of Theatre Mark Wenderlich, The New York Idea opens Thursday, April 10. The show begins at 8 p.m. in the Red Barn Theater, with additional performances Friday, April 11-Saturday, April 12 at 8 p.m., and Sunday, April 13 at 7 p.m.

The plot follows Cynthia Karslake, a freewheeling young divorcee, who decides to settle down again into a much more stable relationship with the prominent Judge Philip Phillimore. Little does she know, however, that neither of their impetuous and unpredictable ex-spouses, nor her beloved race horse Cynthia K, is down for the count.

Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '15

Cynthia’s impulsiveness has driven her ex-spouse, John, to near financial ruin—and, she fears, into the seductive arms of Vida, Phillimore’s vampish ex-wife. To complicate matters, both Cynthia and Vida find themselves attracted to a visiting English gentleman with a lordly estate and an eye for American beauty. In duly antic course, one couple reunites and one stays divorced, while both the old idea of a socially ‘suitable’ marriage and the superficial new “New York idea”—marry for a whim and leave the rest to the divorce court—get thoroughly kicked around. But will Cynthia and John realize that they truly belong together forever before Cynthia makes it to the altar?

Members of the cast include Kimberley Sweet (Mrs. Phillimore), a freshman adolescent mathematics major from Cuba; Michael Musolino Jr. (Sir Wilfred Cates-Darby), a freshman American Sign Language-English interpreting major from Durhamville; Sierra Lynch (Vida Phillimore), a senior psychology major from Watervliet; Caleigh Alterio (Cynthia Karslake), a senior occupational science major from Akron; Phil Atherlay (Sudley/Fiddler), a sophomore adolescent mathematics education major from Deposit; Alicia Brown (Jacqueline), a junior occupational science major from Kirkwood; and William Staub (Thomas), a freshman adolescent English major from Rochester. Justin Krog, program developer for the College’s Office of Information Technology Services (ITS), portrays Phillip Phillimore. Penn Yan resident Brian Cobb ’08, M’11 will return to his alma mater to portray Matthew Phillimore in the production. Cobb teaches English at Penn Yan Middle School. Pat Fegley, a Geneva resident who has worked with the Pennsylvania Yankee Theater Company (PYTCo), portrays John Karslake.

Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '15

Members of the crew include Marissa Rogers, a freshman psychology major from Pompton Plains (stage manager); Danica Zielinski, a senior American Sign Language major from Congers (costume designer); Dan Roach (sound designer); and Trish Ralph (lighting designer).

Ralph is chair of the Department of Theatre and Music Studies and an associate professor of theatre at SUNY Brockport, while Roach has worked with the Eastman Opera, Geva Theatre and Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, among others.

The April 10 performance will benefit the cast members’ annual trip to the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival. All tickets are $7 and will be sold at the door. Tickets for the other three performances are $5 for Keuka College students, faculty, staff, and alumni; and $10 for the general public. Seating is limited.

Pulitzer Prize Nominated Poet to Present Reading

Pulitzer Prize nominee Peter Makuck will read from his fiction and poetry Tuesday, April 1 at Keuka College.

Free and open to the public, the reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Gannett Room of Lightner Library.

Makuck earned a bachelor’s degree from St. Francis College and a Ph.D. in American literature from Kent State University. Makuck’s poetry collection, Long Lens: New & Selected Poems, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. His work has been featured on the Poetry Daily website and on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac.

Makuck’s latest collection of short stories, Allegiance and Betrayal, was published last year, and his previous collection, Costly Habits, was nominated for the Pen/Faulkner Award. He has received honorable mention in Best American Short Stories five times and his poetry collection, Pilgrims, earned the Zoe Kincaid Brockman Award for the best book of poems by a North Carolinian in 1989. Four years later, Makuck earned the Charity Randall Citation, awarded annually by the International Poetry Forum in Pittsburgh.

His poems, stories, and reviews have been published in such journals as Poetry, The Southern Review, The Gettysburg Review, the Yale Review, North American Review, and Ploughshares, the Sewanee Review, among others.

In addition to poetry, Makuck serves as emeritus professor of English at East Carolina University (ECU) in Greenville, N.C. Named a Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at ECU,  Makuck has also served as visiting writer in residence at Brigham Young University and visiting distinguished professor at North Carolina State University, where he also served as the Lee Smith Visiting Poet.

A former Fulbright Exchange Professor to France, Makuck served as juror for the annual Poet’s Prize and received the Brockman Award, given annually for the best collection of poetry by a North Carolinian. He has also contributed to the Raleigh News & Observer, North Carolina’s largest daily newspaper.

‘Stellar’ Student Art on Display

"Paper Trail" by Winsome Zinkievich '14

In the few months that Keuka College has boasted an expanded curriculum in its newest major, Art and Design, students have begun digging into new studio art and digital design courses. Now, they’re showcasing what they’ve learned.

Currently on display at Lightner Gallery in Lightner Library at the College through April 11, the student art show features a collection of digital illustration, mixed media and other designs from the new classes. These pieces are in addition to the photography, paintings, drawings, ceramics and sculptures created in existing classes.

Self Portrait 1, by Amber De Jong '16

“What you see when you walk into the space is the range and breadth of what the new art and design program offers,” said Melissa Newcomb, assistant professor of art.

On Thursday, March 20, from 4:30 – 6 p.m., an artists’ reception with light refreshments will be held at the gallery. All members of the campus community are invited to attend the event, which is free and open to the public. The work in this show has been crafted by freshmen, sophomores, and juniors as well as seniors whose major is not in art. Graduating seniors in the current program will exhibit their cumulative art portfolios later, in the final gallery show of the academic year.

sculpture, pitcher, art, student art show, 2014

"Water Pitcher" by Kaisch Wheeler '14

“This year’s student show work is stellar,” said Winsome Zinkievich ‘14 of her fellow artists. “Though each piece is unique and tells its own story, each piece also compliments all the other works presented.”

Those distinct differences proved a bit perplexing however, when it came to handling logistics for the exhibit, Newcomb pointed out.

“The layout was a challenge because everyone has their own individual style. One piece is not like the next – so how do you create a sense of flow? But it came together with more than one set of eyes and it worked out wonderfully,” she said, crediting Zinkievich, Jesse Ninos ‘17 and Mitch Leet ‘16 for help crafting the overall design of the show.

"Picasso Cityscape" by Jesse Ninos '17

This year’s show demonstrates the strength of the talent being developed at the College through the old and new programs, said Leet, who switched to the new art and design major this fall. Some of the additions to the curriculum include Foundations of Design, the prerequisite course in which students begin developing their art portfolios, Mixed Media, Visual Design, Digital Illustration and Digital Storytelling.

“I’m very excited about the future of art at Keuka and I feel very lucky to be part of such a fantastic show,” Leet said.

Exposing the Myth of Racial Colorblindness

Dr. Aram deKoven, associate professor of education studies at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, will discuss “Subconsciously Held Bias: Exposing the Myth of Racial Colorblindness” Monday, March 17.

The lecture will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Jephson Science Center 104. The presentation, free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs, Division of Social Work, Office of Multicultural Affairs, and the Social Work Club.

deKoven holds bachelor’s degrees in psychology and music from State University of New York at Oswego and a master’s degree in human resources management from Mercy College. He earned a second master’s degree in education and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Cornell University.

deKoven began teaching in after school programs and working with at-risk youth. Later, he taught in Cornell University’s teacher education program and served as visiting assistant professor of education at SUNY Cortland.

“Aram’s message applies across a broad range of bias and is generally geared toward educators,” said Gretchen Rymarchyk, assistant professor of social work. “Teachers might be an obvious target [of those who have bias], but we are all to blame. It happens to adults as well as kids. We don’t mean to do it, but it’s there.”

But Rymarchyk says those in other majors, such as nursing, social work, and occupational therapy, will also benefit from this presentation.

“These students will one day be in a position of power with their client, patient, or student,” said Rymarchyk, “so if they are exercising bias, than they are not getting the outcomes that they should.”

Bias and racism are learned, not inherent, according to Rymarchyk.

“We have bias because we are raised in a society that has on-going oppression,” she added. “I don’t think I have a particular hatred toward others, but I do have bias and I try to pay attention to it. My friends and family have it. I know it’s unintentional, and we don’t mean to have bias, but I see it all around me.”

Added Rymarchyk: “I hope the audience comes to the presentation with a truly open mind, and walks out with ideas on how they can uncover their own bias.”

If you cannot come to the presentation, click to attend via Adode Connect.

Sharing Culture Through Music

The Keuka College Chorale and the Chinese Choral Society of Rochester (CCSR) will be featured in a concert Sunday, March 16, at 3 p.m. in Norton Chapel.

The concert, free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and will be followed by a reception in the Alumni Lounge in Ball Hall. Authentic Chinese food will be served.

“The Chorale is two-thirds Chinese and Vietnamese students, and I was thinking about how hard they have to work to learn, understand, and sing in English,” said Hamilton. “I wondered how our American students would fare learning a piece of music in Chinese.”

Enter CCSR, which promotes the appreciation of Chinese culture through chorus practices and concert performances. The group has been invited to perform in Ottawa, Toronto, and New York City, and has received grants from the Arts & Cultural Council of Greater Rochester.

“I contacted the choral society and wanted to know if they would come for a combined concert,” said Hamilton. “David Chin, the conductor and music director, thought it was a great idea.”

According to Hamilton, the Chorale will sing three selections, and she will perform a solo. Then, CCSR will take the stage. Their performance will feature Chinese soprano soloist, Ai-Ze Wang. The concert will end with both groups combining on two Chinese pieces—“Moon” and “Rasa Sayang,” conducted by Chin, and the final musical selection “Blessing,” sung in English and conducted by Hamilton.

A native of Beijing, China, Wang received her bachelor’s degree from Coe College, a master’s degree in voice from Kansas State University, and a master’s degree in opera from Temple University. She taught voice at Coe College, performed with the Coe Baroque Ensemble, and has studied and performed in Italy. A recording artist, Wang has sung with the Central Opera House of China in Beijing and performed leading roles with the Opera Theatre of Rochester.

David Chin

Chin serves as adjunct professor of music at Roberts Wesleyan College, where he is the director of choral activities and conducts the Roberts Wesleyan Chorale.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in choral and piano performance from Liberty University and was awarded both Outstanding Music Student and Keyboard Student of the Year in 2010. He earned his master of music degree in conducting from the Eastman School of Music, and completed his Piano Associate Diploma (ATCL) at Trinity College in London. Chin was awarded the Charles W. Kennett Scholarship and the Herman Genhart Choral Conducting Scholar Award by the Eastman School of Music.

Chin has served as the guest conductor of the International Christian Choral Conductor Society, and conducted the opening concerts of the new Eastman School Bach Cantata Series and the Hong Kong Bach Cantata Lecture Concert. He taught at the World Sacred Music Conferences in Auckland, New Zealand and Medan, Indonesia, and was selected to attend the Sarteano Chamber Music Workshop in Italy and Helmuth Rilling’s Masterclass in Hong Kong.

Recent highlights include conducting performances of Bach’s St. John Passion; Handel’s Messiah; Vivaldi’s Gloria; and Mozart’s Missa Brevis in G, among others. He has also conducted selections by Mendelssohn, Brahms, Duruflé, Sibelius, and Samuel Barber; and recently performed piano works by Bach, Haydn, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, and Debussy.

Currently a member of the renowned Christ Church Schola Cantorum in Rochester, Chin also sings with the Voices ensemble, Eastman Chorale, and Eastman-Rochester Chorus. He has conducted the Eastman Repertory Singers and Eastman Chorale, and served as the accompanist of the Eastman Women’s Chorus.

While the concert is free, donations will be accepted for purchase of new music, instruments, and other items needed for the advancement of the music program.

College to Screen “Inequality for All” Feb. 20

Inequality for All, the award-winning documentary featuring former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich, will be screened Thursday, Feb. 20, at Keuka College.

The film will be shown at 5 p.m. in Jephson 104 and will be followed by a national webcast in which Reich will participate. It is free and open to the public.

Inequality for All “does for income disparity what An Inconvenient Truth did for climate change, according to Variety. It won a Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

The film is an intimate portrait of Reich, who has overcome a great deal of personal adversity and whose lifelong goal remains protecting those who are unable to protect themselves. Through his singular perspective, Reich explains how the massive consolidation of wealth by a precious few threatens the viability of the American workforce and the foundation of democracy itself. Reich uses humor and a wide array of facts to explain how the issue of economic inequality affects each of us.

“I want to help people understand the economic truth because they are stressed, angry, and frustrated, and the tide is only rising on that front,” said Reich. “Their debt obligations are staggering, yet—if lucky enough to have a job—they’re working harder and longer than ever before. People need to understand what’s happening to them, because from their perspective, the picture looks pretty bleak.”

Founding editor of  American Prospect magazine and chairman of Common Cause, Reich is Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and senior fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies. The author of 13 books, including the best-sellers “Aftershock” and “The Work of Nations,” Reich’s latest, “Beyond Outrage,” is now in paperback. Time magazine named him one of the 10 most effective cabinet secretaries of the 20th century.

“This movie is critically important,” said Reich, “[as it] exposes the heart of our economic problem. I’ve spent most of my working life concerned about what’s happening to American workers—their jobs, their wages, their hopes and fears.

“We’re in the biggest economic slump since the Great Depression,” added Reich, “and we can’t seem to get out of it. Why? Because, exactly as in the 1920s, so much of the nation’s income and wealth are going to the top, that the vast middle class doesn’t have the purchasing power to keep the economy going.”

Added Reich: “One of the best ways to help people understand the challenges we face is with a movie that can grab an audience and move them to action. And this movie will do exactly that.”

Faculty Member, Author will Discuss His Novel Look at the Kennedy Assassination

Keuka College’s Community Luncheon Series will continue Wednesday, Jan. 22, with a talk by a former nuclear engineer who has written a novel about the assassination of President Kennedy.

Stan Wilczek Jr., assistant professor of business and management, will discuss “Did Oswald Act Alone? Author Believes He Did, but His Book Tells a Different Story,” at noon in the Gannett Room of Lightner Library.

Wilczek is convinced Oswald acted alone Nov. 22, 1963, but his novel, Last Witness, is filled—as the jacket of the book describes—with “secrets, seductions, sex, lies, cover-ups, and conspiracies.”

“I love writing fiction,” said Wilczek, “because I can write whatever I want.”

He has published three other mystery thrillers: The Kept Secret, The Soma Man, and Death’s Revenge.

Wilczek spent 30 years in the nuclear and utility industry, the last third as vice president and corporate officer. He earned an associate degree in engineering science from Mohawk Valley Community College, a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering from SUNY Buffalo, an MBA from Syracuse University, and graduated from Harvard’s Advanced Management Program.

Tickets for the luncheon are $12.75, $2.50 of which goes to the Penn Yan Keuka Club Scholarship Fund. The fund provides an annual scholarship to a local student attending Keuka College. Seating is limited, so reservations are advised.

Make checks payable to Keuka College and mail to: Office of Alumni and Family Relations, Keuka College, Keuka Park, N.Y. 14478. Reservations may also be made online at http://events.keuka.edu. The reservation deadline is Friday, Jan. 17, 2014.

For more information, call (315) 279-5238 or email spevents@keuka.edu.

Full Steam Ahead for Music Program

With Keuka College’s fall Chorale and Band concert in the books, Kelley Hamilton, music instructor and director of the Chorale, has her sights set on the future of the music program.

And the future starts during the spring 2014 semester, when Hamilton will hold auditions for students who want to join a select choir.

Hamilton envisions the select choir performing at on-campus events, alumni gatherings, and traveling for student recruitment.

“It will be a polished, professional group that will showcase the College and give Keuka students a high-quality music experience,” said Hamilton, who plans to have the choir accompanied by live instrumentalists.

Hamilton, who has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) and other well-known groups, “likes to sing a lot of different genres, and I want to incorporate those genres into the choir.”

With that variety in mind, Hamilton anticipates the choir will sing “mostly pop, R&B, jazz, and Broadway, as well as present some a cappella pieces.”

Chorale member Jakiem Brown ’15, an educational studies major from Rochester, would seem to be a logical candidate for the select choir.

“Many of my best singers and musicians are athletes, and Jakiem is a member of both the men’s volleyball and tennis teams,” said Hamilton. “He plays the saxophone and ukulele, sings, and beat-boxes. He performed a solo during the concert, and is just a great kid who is hungry for more.”

Another athlete who would seem to a logical select choir candidate is Stephanie Havens ’14. The adolescent English major from Unadilla is a forward/midfielder for the women’s soccer team, and has been “singing and playing the trumpet for a long time.

“I liked that I could join Chorale or Band and have private voice lessons,” said Havens. “There is a Mozart piece I am working on that I am excited about, but is nothing I’d have ever considered if not for the voice lessons. I am not afraid to get up and sing in front of people anymore.”

Kelsea Flynn

As the select choir works through its formative stages, the popularity of the Chorale is growing, as evidenced by Kelsea Flynn ’17, a psychology major from Penn Yan. She sang a duet at the concert and “is excited to participate in Chorale next semester.”

“There are a lot of new students registered for Chorale next semester, and I’m excited,” said Hamilton. “There will be some challenges, though. I have several Chinese students registered, and a lot of students can’t read music. But, I hope to incorporate more popular songs into the concerts, and to one day partner with the Arion Players Drama Club and perform a musical.”

Next semester will also bring the formation of a jazz band, private instrumental lessons, and a possible concert with the Chinese Choral Society of Rochester.

“There are many Chinese students in the Keuka College Chorale and I wanted to find an authentic experience for them,” said Hamilton.

Also on tap for next semester will be new music opportunities in the classroom. Hamilton will teach a class on American Music Traditions, which will explore the history of American popular and classical music, including colonial folk music, blues,  jazz, Broadway, rap, and hip hop, among others.

Added Hamilton: “One of the things I hope to do is partner with [Assistant Professor of Art] Melissa Newcomb’s students in her digital photography class and have them design album covers for my students.”