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Archive for the ‘From the Field’ Category

Putting Theory into Practice

Editor’s note: This is the fouth in a series of 2015 Field Period™ scholarship recipients. Senior Genille Gordon received the Konica Minolta Scholarships for Graphic Arts and Print-related Field Period™ experiences. In support of academic excellence, Konica Minolta will offer $30,000 ($10,000 each year from 2014-2016) to be used as scholarship funding for internships or a Field Period™ that promotes the advancement of graphic and/or print-related studies. Amounts awarded will vary based on the expense needs of each recipient as determined by a committee.

Students such as Keuka College senior Genille Gordon know that combining the knowledge gained from her classes, experiential learning, as well as skills and values learned from outside the traditional classroom setting, will help her go far in life.

But she also knows being able to effectively use technology will strengthen her learning experiences and will set her apart from her peers after she graduates.

Gordon will add to her arsenal during her Field Period™ when she becomes a social media intern at TickleMe Entertainment in Las Vegas. TickleMe Entertainment produces stand-up comedy, music, and variety shows.

“My Field Period™ will help me grow while incorporating Keuka College’s experiential and digital learning concepts,” said Gordon. “Additionally, this Field Period™ will help me gain valuable experience that will help throughout my career. For instance, it will teach me how to think about social media on a business level rather than a personal level.”

Gordon adds that her current academic program provides knowledge of print media, graphic design, marketing, publishing, and print production. She expects her Field Period™ will expand those skills and “offer me the opportunity to practice the graphic and print-related techniques my organizational communication classes have taught me.”

Those techniques include project management, web design, social media marketing, exploring and expanding her creativity, using typography and learning how it applies to social networking, using design software, as well as practicing color theory.

“In other words, I will learn how to take a company’s values, needs, and voice and put that in 140 characters or less,” said Gordon.

Added Gordon: “The knowledge and professional growth I will gain while being a social media intern for TickleMe Entertainment will further contribute to my personal development of experiential and digital learning. Having the opportunity to create e-portfolios and different social media platforms while building my communication skills will be challenging and rewarding.”

Putting Classroom Skills to the Test

 Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of 2015 Field Period™ scholarship recipients. Seniors Samantha Staino and Denise Dolph each received a Judith Oliver Brown Memorial Award. The award, named after the late 1963 Keuka College graduate, is supported by Brown’s family and the Class of ’63. It is designed to assist students who pursue a culturally-oriented Field Period™.

Samantha Staino

Senior occupational therapy (OT) major Samantha Staino enjoys OT’s flexibility, diversity and how it can be used to help people, but believes that she must travel in order to maximize her burgeoning skills, to best serve her future clients.

Staino’s classmate Denise Dolph, also an OT major, wants to further develop her interpersonal skills she believes will be essential when talking with a future client. She also wants to connect with someone who might benefit from OT and how it may help them.

Both Staino and Dolph will have the opportunity to expand their current skills and learn new ones as they travel to Santa Domingo, old district in the Dominican Republic. They will travel to San Jose de Ocoa and nearby villages, where they intend to learn more about ways to further their knowledge of OT and discover new ways to treat future clients.

The classmates are completing their Field Period™ through EF Tours and are a part of a wonderful experience that also includes social work and nursing students. The tours are a large part of the Association para el Desarrollo de San José de Ocoa (ADESJO). The organization promotes integrated and sustainable development of the province of San José de Ocoa and surrounding areas through the participation of its people in self-management programs of a social, economic, educational, cultural, environmental, and health.

“The idea of having OT students participate in an emerging area Field Period™ is a unique and beneficial experience,” said Staino. “This challenges us to push ourselves outside of our comfort zones and put our skills to test. Not only is it beneficial to us as future therapists, but also in educating the local community about the importance and value of our profession.”

Dolph agrees.

Denise Dolph

“Over the span of eight days in the Dominican Republic, we will be exposed to a number of learning opportunities,” she said. “On an individual level, I will further develop my interpersonal skills that will be essential in my field, while gaining valuable knowledge of the island’s culture. Some of the most exciting aspects of the trip will be the visit to the vegetable processing center, participating in a service project in the health center in San Jose de Ocoa, learning about the different aspects of the agroforestry tree nursery and hydroelectric plant, and meeting a midwife.”

And meeting midwives is something both Staino and Dolph both look forward to, as they want to understand the differences in healthcare, illustrate the importance of occupational therapy and how it can be beneficial to one’s overall health, and demonstrate how OT can be implemented in a non-traditional setting.

They also plan to conduct a semi-structured interview on a patient in the Santo Domingo Health Center, generate an occupational therapy evaluation for a patient in the local clinic, and create a potential treatment plan for a client after an elder home visit.

“Saint Augustine once said ‘the world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page,’” said Dolph. “By never leaving the northeast region of the United States, I have been on the same page of my book. But after completing this Field Period™, I will be able to explore a new culture, turn the page and read more, and begin a new chapter in my book.”

So will Staino.

“Being able to travel to the Dominican Republic will expose me to another culture and way of life,” she said. “I will benefit from this experience as I challenge my skills and knowledge, expand my imagination and creativity, develop my treating style and clinical reasoning, as well as allow myself to be more culturally aware of others and appreciative of our profession.”

Staino believes that having the opportunity to introduce occupational therapy will be an important step in bringing the significance of its benefits on a more global scale.

“Every individual—no matter their background or culture—deserves to live their life to the fullest. Being able to make that difference in someone’s life will never be a day of ‘work’ to me,” she said.

Staino added that her trip will allow “me to combine my cultural experience with occupational therapy which will in turn continue my growth as a future therapist. Being able to travel will allow me to help others, and develop a greater appreciation for life, and all it has to offer.”

Added Dolph: “Surely, traveling to the Dominican Republican will open an entirely new chapter in the world’s book that I am so unfamiliar with.”

‘GIVE-ing’ to Those Less Fortunate

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of 2015 Field Period™ scholarship recipients. Sophomores Aysia Smith and Emma Barden each received a Judith Oliver Brown Memorial Award. The award, named after the late 1963 Keuka College graduate, is supported by Brown’s family and the Class of ’63. It is designed to assist students who pursue a culturally-oriented Field Period™.

Aysia Smith

If there is a motto that rings true for sophomores Aysia Smith and Emma Barden, it might be ‘never put off until tomorrow what you can do today.’

That’s because while these Keuka College classmates each had intentions to travel while they were still in college, they both wanted to wait until they believed they had more life experience.

For example, Smith originally intended to complete a cultural Field Period™ during her senior year.

“I thought I should wait until I had more college experience and time to raise money,” said the early childhood/special education major with a global concentration. “My plans shifted dramatically in July, when my 14-year-old little brother, Alex, was killed in a farming accident. This tragedy taught me that you should pursue experiences and make a difference whenever possible.”

Barden shares that thought, as she also experienced loss over the summer with the death of her grandmother.

“Many people, like my grandmother, don’t have the opportunity to travel, but wish they had,” said the art and design major. “Her life was taken from pancreatic cancer, and she never had the chance to travel and learn about different cultures.”

So when both young women saw the opportunity to travel, they took it. Smith and Barden will travel with Growth International Volunteer Excursions (GIVE) to the Southeastern Asian nations of Laos and Thailand. GIVE is a Seattle-based volunteer organization that unites international volunteering with adventure travel to create a meaningful volunteer experience abroad. Both Smith and Barden will assist the local communities by teaching English to children and help build sustainable infrastructures using recycled plastic bottles as bricks.

“When I enrolled at Keuka College, I knew I wanted to spend time volunteering in Asia,” said Smith. “I have always loved volunteering, and Southeast Asia’s culture of helping each other is fascinating.”

“I believe that the best learning comes from first hand experiences of life lessons and culture that cannot be created in a classroom,” she added. “As an educator, I want to understand how to teach students who are English-learners and learn how to create lessons that are culturally appropriate.”

Emma Barden

And while Smith creates those lesson plans, Barden will focus more on understanding why Buddhism means so much to her.

“Buddhism inspires me and I am excited to learn more about this religion,” said Barden. “Buddhists conduct their lives so peacefully, and I think about the way they live as a way to help me overcome my anxiety. This journey will bring me the opportunity to speak with the local monks during a Buddhist Alms ceremony.”

Barden will also volunteer at the Asiatic Black Bear Rescue Center where she will assist with landscaping and terracing.

“Not only will I be volunteering, but immersing myself into the local lifestyle and culture,” she said. “This is exciting because I have a strong desire for traveling and learning, and this experience will help fulfill my passions. I look forward to realizing my Field Period™ goals and objectives, bringing them to life during my journey.”

Smith agrees.

“Allowing myself to be submerged in a new culture will grant me the opportunity to learn about myself, and what I can do to be a more culturally rounded individual,” she said. “I will also learn to form connections with people who are different from me as I develop a deeper appreciation for the Asian culture. This will help me become a more knowledgeable educator and citizen, as this is critical in today’s world.”

Added Barden: “Volunteering abroad has always been my dream, and I am grateful to receive the Judith Oliver Brown Memorial Fund Award and follow in her footsteps. This award will allow me to have a life-changing experience which I can share and encourage fellow students to do the same.”

Penguins, Monuments, Wine, and More

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of 2015 Field Period™ scholarship recipients. Junior Aksel Jensen received a Judith Oliver Brown Memorial Award. The award, named after the late 1963 Keuka College graduate, is supported by Brown’s family and the Class of ’63. It is designed to assist students who pursue a culturally-oriented Field Period™.

Lucius Annaeus Seneca once said ‘travel and change of place impart new vigor to the mind.’ And new vigor is what junior Aksel Jensen intends to pursue during his Field Period™ to South Africa.

The management major will spend 12 days in the home of his friend and Keuka College senior Stuart Carmichael-Green and his family, including Stuart’s brother James, who is a sophomore at the College.

“The Carmichael-Green family has offered me a great opportunity with their willingness to show me the cultural activities of their homeland,” said Jensen.

One of the activities that will be familiar to Jensen is the opportunity to attend wine tours and see firsthand how their wine country compares to that of the Finger Lakes. According to Jensen, one of the biggest imports from South Africa to America is wine.

“Stuart and James’ father, Mark, is a wine maker,” said Jensen. “He has offered to show me the differences he sees in business between South Africa and America, as he takes trips to America for business. As a management major, this is what I am extremely excited about, as this will help me have a better understanding of international business.”

“This will allow me to discover different types of business activities and markets in another country such as the importation and exportation of different goods between South Africa and America,” Jensen added.

In addition, Jensen said the Carmichael-Green family will help him explore “attractions that regular travelers would see, but we will also tour the ‘real’ highlights of the area, such as the different historical monuments that commemorate the contributions slaves made to the city and the discrimination they faced.”

Jensen will also visit the beaches of Boulder’s Bay, which features South Africa’s largest penguin population, and try popular foods like biltong, a dried meat product similar to beef jerky.

Added Jensen: “I am extremely excited to immerse myself in a different culture for the first time.”

Hunter Heselton Creates ITS Work-Study Guide, Documents Each Konica Minolta Printer During Field Period™

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of 2015 Konica Minolta Scholarships for Graphic Arts and Print-related Field Period™ experiences. In support of academic excellence, Konica Minolta will offer $30,000 ($10,000 each year from 2014-2016) to be used as scholarship funding for internships or a Field Period™ that promotes the advancement of graphic and/or print-related studies. Amounts awarded will vary based on the expense needs of each recipient as determined by the committee.

Hunter Heselton receives congratulations from Tara Bloom, assistant director of Field Period™ and internships, during Honors Convocation (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

The work sophomore Hunter Heselton completed during his Field Period™ with Keuka College’s Information Technology Services (ITS) will last long after he graduates.

That’s because the Penn Yan resident created an ITS work-study student training guide, which includes a combination of online activities, printed material, and video podcasts.

“With the partnership between Konica Minolta and Keuka College, the main role for my Field Period™ was to develop the guidelines and procedures that the students, faculty, and staff will utilize within the managed print environment,” said Heselton, an exploratory major. “I worked closely with the ITS staff to develop the procedures and guidelines that will be utilized as the basis for the ITS work-study student training guides.”

And if you ask him, Heselton can tell you the location of each of the 44 fleet printers and three production-based Konica Minolta devices across campus and the Center for Professional Studies. He spent “substantial” time dedicated toward the asset management and documentation of the not only the location of each Konica Minolta device, but it’s model number and serial number as well.

He also familiarized himself with the functionality and nomenclature of the 44 printers, including standard printing, copying, scanning, and faxing procedures.

“I also conducted an analysis of the wireless printing capabilities across campus utilizing the Konica Minolta Equitrac/PrinterOn solution to include all residence halls,” Heselton said. “Any problematic areas were documented within the IT Services call-tracking system.”

Heselton then coordinated the scheduling of, and presented, an Equitrac/PrinterOn printer training classes to all departments. It is a printing management system that provides tools to enforce student print quotas, charge for printed output and promote sustainability.

“I was thrilled to work with ITS, and learn about the latest technologies at Keuka College,” Heselton said of his Field Period™.