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Top Student Worker, Boss Honored

Student Employee of the Year recipient Brandon Jacobs is flanked by Jeff Bray and Sally Daggett

The “face of Game Day and Event Management” and a “role model, mentor, and friend” were the respective recipients of the 2014 Student Employee and Work-Study Supervisor of the Year awards, respectively, at the Student Employment Awards Luncheon April 17.

Senior management major Brandon Jacobs and Interlibrary Loan Librarian Kimberley Fenton were selected by two separate panels of judges.

Jacobs, nominated for the award by Jeff Bray, associate director of athletics, has worked in Game Day and Event Management for four years.

“You think when you go to a sporting event on the Keuka College campus, it just happens—but it only happens because of Brandon,” said Bray, who sees the Walworth resident as a co-worker.

As the student supervisor for Game Day and Event Management, Jacobs’ role is “absolutely critical” to the success of hosting home sporting events.

“Over the past year, Brandon has become the ‘face’ of our game management staff,” said Bray. “Referees, visiting coaches, and our own coaching staff know he is someone they can count on and is the ‘go-to’ person.”

Jacobs is responsible for the organization and set-up for more than 70 home sporting events—including equipment, sound systems, scoreboards, visiting locker rooms, and game officials.

“In doing so, it has been assumed by many that he is member of our professional staff; not a student employee,” said Bray. “When those individuals comment on a job well done, they are shocked to learn that he is a student. Brandon has aspirations of becoming a college athletics director and has really taken stock in his opportunity as a work study student.”

Sally Daggett (l), poses with the Student Employee of the Year nominees including Megan Barney, Lee Bottoni, Brandon Jacobs, Brianna Long, Karina Cochran, Kayla Garrow, and Megan Barney

The other student nominees were Lee Bottoni, Kayla Garrow, Karina Cochran, Kelsey Morgan, Brianna Long, and Megan Barney.

“Recognizing our work-study students is important, and this is an opportunity to honor the best of the best of our student workers,” said Sally Daggett, human resources manager. “I am proud of the work all of our 442 students, who perform 870 jobs for an average of six hours a week. If we were to hire full-time employees to do the work they do, we would need 103 more full-time employees. So, Keuka College students do a massive amount of work.”

Work Study Supervisor of the Year Kimberley Fenton holds her plaque next to Sally Daggett and Faith Garlington

Fenton was one of five work-study supervisors nominated for the award. She was nominated by occupational science majors Alysa Halsey and Faith Garlington.

Both were nervous about finding a work study position when they arrived as freshmen on campus, but since then, Halsey and Garlington believe Fenton has welcomed and included them in many library related tasks.

“Ms. Fenton has steered me toward success in any activity that I do,” said Halsey, an occupational science major from Pulaski. “She gives me freedom and allows me to feel independent by figuring out problems on my own, but reminds me she will always be there to answer any questions I have.”

That freedom and independence includes creating display case designs for patrons of the library to view.

“Ms. Fenton usually just lets me do whatever inspires me about the particular topic that is being displayed at the time,” said Halsey. “I use my imagination for the appearance, and my knowledge for the information that is being displayed. She provides me with the responsibility of creating displays, but I know that if I need advice or help I can always go to her for guidance.”

Garlington, who also assists in creating displays, agrees.

“I have also used my academic background in the creation of specialty displays for different disease awareness months,” said Garlington. “As an occupational science major, I have learned about many disorders which have ‘awareness months’ and I am often recruited to come up with display ideas. When I achieve these special goals, the other librarians also support me. They notice a particularly job well done and offer support in any task with which I may struggle.”

Halsey says Fenton creates a “quality and challenging environment by pushing me to work for the things I don’t believe that I can accomplish. She exemplifies the characteristics of a leader and a role model while helping me achieve the goals and dreams that would otherwise be out of reach.”

In her time with Fenton, Garlington has “gradually received more responsibility. [For example], this past fall when Ms. Fenton hired a new assistant to replace a graduating senior, I was entrusted to train her in many different aspects of the job. I had to act as a professional while showing the new student how to do many tasks. This made me feel as though I was a part of the library staff.”

Sally Daggett (l), poses with the Work Study Supervisor of the Year nominees Lori Haines, John Boccacino, Kimberley Fenton, Michelle Polowchak, and Karlee Roberts

The other supervisor nominees were Lori Haines (assistant secretary to the Board of Trustees/board liaison and presidential support specialist.), John Boccacino (sports information director), Michelle Polowchak (director of human resources) and Karlee Roberts (D.R.I.V.E. peer mentor supervisor).

“Thank you to our student workers for the excellent work you do across the entire campus, and to our work study supervisors who provide a positive working environment,” said Anne Weed, vice president for academic affairs. “Thank you to all the nominators for recognizing how important it is to make people feel the worth of what they do every day.”

Each of the nominees was recognized at the luncheon by his or her nominator and presented with a gift. The names of the student and supervisor award recipients will be added to two separate plaques housed in the Center for Experiential Learning. The Student Employee of the Year plaque is hung up in the winner’s work-study location until the following year’s awards luncheon.

Click for more photos from the luncheon.

Cosgrove: College will Continue to Flourish

Michaela Cosgrove has been working since she was 14, the last 33 years at Keuka College.

“I’ve stayed because there are students to teach, and teaching is what I love,” said Cosgrove, who retired at the end of the 2012-13 academic year and was granted professor emerita status by the Board of Trustees. “But I wanted to retire before the job got stale and I didn’t look forward to coming to work anymore. I wanted to go when I was still happy and happy with the way things are.

“I am extremely impressed with the new faculty coming in,” she said. “They are in tune with the students, they know their stuff, and are professionals. I like that a lot. Keuka College is a unique place to be and I know it will continue to flourish.”

The College is in that position thanks in part to Cosgrove, named Professor of the Year in 2004.

“Her students consistently praise her for her deep love of literature and language studies, and her passion for her teaching. Described as an outstanding teacher and mentor by her colleagues and students, she has made a profound and lasting impact on the College,” said Anne Weed, vice president for academic affairs.

That lasting impact has been felt across campus as Cosgrove has served in a number of roles throughout her tenure.

“In her distinguished career at Keuka, which has spanned three decades, she has served as an exceptional teacher of Spanish, director of the Higher Education Opportunity Program, assistant academic dean, dean of students, registrar, and as chair of the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts,” said Weed.

And while Cosgrove enjoyed her administrative duties, teaching has her heart.

“I had the opportunity to teach in graduate school, jumped at the chance to do so, and I found that I loved it,” said Cosgrove. “I was able to continue teaching one course a semester while serving as dean of students and really enjoyed it. I learned a lot as an administrator, but teaching is my passion and was glad to do it full-time.”

She has taught Spanish language, literature and culture; Latin America; U.S.-Latino literature; Spanish for professional purposes; and introductory linguistics, among others.

Outside the classroom, Cosgrove must be credited for heightening student interest in international Field Periods.

“I remember fondly the intensity and pleasure of leading so many group Field Periods to Mexico,” said Cosgrove, who is pleased with the College’s global approach to education. “I am most happy about the international connection the students have now, and am hopeful that our state-based students will take the opportunity to travel and learn the languages and culture of others. It’s good to see students whose first language is not English come into the classroom and interact with the traditional students.”

And while Cosgrove may be leaving teaching behind, she will have many opportunities to speak Spanish.

“My daughter lives in Spain and we’ve been to visit every year,” Cosgrove said. “Last summer, we travelled throughout the country by car as our son-in-law and my husband biked. We saw many little towns I’d love to go back to and explore.”

She also plans several visits to see her son and daughter-in-law, both Keuka graduates, who now live in Arizona. Other plans include yoga, traveling during the semester, and looking for possible volunteer opportunities, such as conflict mediation, something she has done in the past.

“I will do some writing as well,” she said. “I like to write essays, but whether anyone will read them is something different. A long time ago, I was on staff of the Corning Leader covering such events as the Cohocton school board meetings. I might go back to that because I like the writing it involves. I really just want to see what happens.”

Academic Excellence Initiatives Support Student Projects

Keuka College may not be considered a “research school” in the traditional sense but that doesn’t mean  research and scholarship don’t exist on campus.

In fact,  multiple student research studies and creative projects are funded by grants provided through the Office of Academic Affairs.

The Academic Excellence Initiatives, begun in fall 2010, has supported student research, scholarship or creative projects to the tune of $5,139. Each year, up to $2,000 in grants is awarded to support undergraduate student research, scholarship or creative projects. Students work with a faculty sponsor to develop their projects and then apply through a competitive grant process. The proposals are reviewed by a team of six faculty members before awards are made.

Stephanie Lange '12 with her bronze installation

In 2010-11, a quartet of science majors received awards for research projects later presented at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR). And another student received almost $300 to conduct a study of sensory exploration for elementary education. In 2012,  Stephanie Lange ’12, a visual and verbal art major, received $500 to complete an art installation of a bronze hawk that now graces the campus along the path that runs to the west of Allen Hall towards Jephson Science Center. A second visual and verbal art major, Kat Andonucci ’14, received $560 for a photographic study of chemical experiments, which became an art exhibit, “The Art of Chemistry.”

This academic year, Andonucci received another grant, for $500, to conduct a new independent study: painting portions of the Periodic Table, with the elements themselves. Adult social work student Cyndy Bundy of East Syracuse received $650 to travel to Myrtle Beach last month to present her study on  the responsible use of social networking for relevant social work education and counseling at the national Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors Conference.  Also this semesester, Amber JeJong ’16 received a $342 grant to study changes in the eggs (particularly shell thickness) of the red-shouldered hawk, under the supervision of  Dr. Bill Brown, assistant professor of biology and environmental science. Keuka holds a collection of preserved eggs of that bird dating to almost 100 years ago, and DeJong plans to compare measurements of Keuka’s collection with data from studies of the 1970s, after pesticides impacting that bird population were introduced.

Junior Kat Andonucci and Dr. Andy Robak, associate professor of chemistry during the Art of Chemistry exhibit (Photo by Erik Holmes '13)

Keuka students are encouraged to consult with any faculty member about pursuing an Academic Excellence Initiatives grant for a new research study or project for the coming summer or next academic year. The application deadline for academic ‘13-’14 is May 1. For more information, go to:

http://vpaa.keuka.edu/student-excellence/undergraduate-research-and-scholarship/

The competitive grant awards are offered in support of the College’s mission to challenge students intellectually and to foster their academic development. According to Anne Weed, vice president of academic affairs, faculty serving on the grant application review board are Anita Chirco, professor of communication, Mike Rogoff, professor of psychology, Dianne Trickey-Rockenbrod, assistant professor of occupational therapy, Stephanie Craig, chair of the social work division, Tom Carroll, professor of chemistry and physics, and Angela Narasimhan, assistant professor of political science.

Employees Honored at Community Day

Forty-nine faculty and staff members were recognized for their service and dedication to Keuka College at Community Day Aug. 20.

Keuka College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, second from right, poses with five-year service award recipients.

Five-year service awards were presented to: Eva Moberg-Sarver, director of student activities/associate director of New Student Orientation; Doreen Hovey, executive assistant to the vice president for academic affairs; Jonathan Accardi, director of campus recreation; Christopher Leahy, associate professor of history; Andrew Robak, assistant professor of chemistry; Patricia Mattingly, assistant professor of nursing; Jennifer Mealy, assistant professor of social work; Kimberly Fenton, interlibrary loan librarian; Joshua Ficks, manager of TeamWorks!; Judy Gilmartin, administrative programmer; John Locke, director of instructional design and multidisciplinary studies; Kathleen Snow, academic skills counselor; Marjorie Multer, administrative assistant, admissions; Julie Burns-Percy, assistant professor of social work, Accelerated Studies for Adults Program (ASAP); Jessica Noveck, student services representative; Chevanne DeVaney, director of multicultural affairs; Teri Spoor, IKON site manager; Craig Gelder, manager, Follett Bookstore; Terry Reape, dining services; Korey Goodman, dining services; Steven Riekofski, maintenance; and Sue Morse, housekeeping.

Keuka College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, second from right, poses with 10-year service award recipients.

Ten-year service awards were presented to Tim Sellers, associate vice president for academic affairs; Vicki Smith, chair and professor of occupational therapy; Tom Tremer, chair and professor of criminology/criminal justice; Anna Decker, secretary, education graduate studies and administrative assistant, Lightner Library; Sharon Tyler, associate professor and librarian; and Susan DeLyser, human resource manager.

Fifteen-year service awards were presented to Jean Wannall, professor of occupational therapy; Anne Weed, vice president of academic affairs; Brad Turner, technical support technician; Kathy Waye, executive director of alumni and family relations; and Kasey Klingensmith, professor of biology.

A 20-year service award was presented to Jeff Bray, assistant director of athletics and head athletic trainer.

Twenty-five year service awards were presented to Doug Richards, chair and professor of English; and Sherry Fox, accounts payable.

College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera and Professor of Biology Joan Magnusen.

Tom Carroll, professor of chemistry and physics (left) with College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera.

Thirty-year service awards were presented to Tom Carroll, professor of chemistry and physics; and Joan Magnusen, professor of biology.

Merit awards were presented to: Laura Alfieris, assistant director of admissions; Carroll; Rachel E. Dewey, communications specialist; Kathleen Hastings, assistant director of admissions counseling; Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English; Kelly Lickert, head coach, women’s lacrosse; Eugene Mont, resident director, Ball Hall and retention counselor; Tim White, resident director, Blyley and Harrington Halls and retention counselor; and Penny Webber, office manager for Academic Success at Keuka (ASK).

College President Díaz-Herrera (center) with Tracy McFarland (left) and Christen Accardi.

Two Presidential Awards for Sustained Outstanding Achievement were presented to Christen Accardi, marketing manager, ASAP; and Tracy McFarland, associate vice president for student development.

104th Commencement Resumes in Tianjin, China

Keuka College’s 104th commencement did not conclude with the awarding of degrees Sunday, May 27, in Keuka Park.

It continued yesterday (Wednesday, May 30) morning when 85 students from Tianjin University of Science and Technology (TUST) in China received Bachelor of Science degrees in management.

Keuka President Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Anne Weed, and Administrative Chancellor for China Campuses Dr. Michael Hwang were on hand to congratulate the newest additions to the College’s alumni ranks.

In his commencement address, Díaz-Herrera said there are “very few students anywhere in the world today who will earn separate undergraduate degrees from two great academic institutions, from two different nations, two far apart continents, and in two very different languages.” (more…)