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Posts Tagged ‘division of humanities and fine art’

Poet Laureate of Missouri to Read Here April 15


Keuka College’s Spotlight Series will continue with a reading by William Trowbridge, the Poet Laureate of Missouri, Tuesday, April 15.

Free and open to the public, the reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Gannett Room of Lightner Library.

Trowbridge holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a master’s degree in English from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a doctoral degree in English from Vanderbilt University. In April 2012, he was appointed to a two-year term as Poet Laureate of Missouri.

Trowbridge has five collections of poetry, including Ship of Fool, The Complete Book of Kong, Flickers, O Paradise, and Enter Dark Stranger; and three chapbooks including The Packing House Cantata, The Four Seasons, and The Book of Kong.  

A Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at Northwest Missouri State University, his poems have appeared in more than 30 anthologies, textbooks, and periodicals including Bouelvard, Colorado Review, Columbia, Crazyhorse, Gettysburg Review, The Georgia Review, New Letters, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Southern Review, and Tar River Poetry, among others. Two of Trowbridges’s books consist of monologues delivered by King Kong.

Among his awards include an Academy of American Poets Prize, a Pushcart Prize, a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference scholarship, a Camber Press Poetry Chapbook Award, and fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Ragdale, Yaddo, and The Anderson Center. Trowbridge served as an editor of The Laurel Review, one of the Midwest’s leading literary journals, for 18 years.

Now living in Lee’s Summit, Mo., Trowbridge teaches in the University of Nebraska low-residency MFA in writing program.

Romantic Whims A-Plenty in College Production

Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '15

A look at two couples’ recent divorces in 1906 New York City society sets the scene for The New York Idea, the spring theatrical production at Keuka College.

The farce, written by Langdon Mitchell and updated by David Auburn, depicts the comedic entanglements of divorce while mixing in one visiting English lord smitten with the city’s easy way with matrimony.

Directed by Professor of Theatre Mark Wenderlich, The New York Idea opens Thursday, April 10. The show begins at 8 p.m. in the Red Barn Theater, with additional performances Friday, April 11-Saturday, April 12 at 8 p.m., and Sunday, April 13 at 7 p.m.

The plot follows Cynthia Karslake, a freewheeling young divorcee, who decides to settle down again into a much more stable relationship with the prominent Judge Philip Phillimore. Little does she know, however, that neither of their impetuous and unpredictable ex-spouses, nor her beloved race horse Cynthia K, is down for the count.

Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '15

Cynthia’s impulsiveness has driven her ex-spouse, John, to near financial ruin—and, she fears, into the seductive arms of Vida, Phillimore’s vampish ex-wife. To complicate matters, both Cynthia and Vida find themselves attracted to a visiting English gentleman with a lordly estate and an eye for American beauty. In duly antic course, one couple reunites and one stays divorced, while both the old idea of a socially ‘suitable’ marriage and the superficial new “New York idea”—marry for a whim and leave the rest to the divorce court—get thoroughly kicked around. But will Cynthia and John realize that they truly belong together forever before Cynthia makes it to the altar?

Members of the cast include Kimberley Sweet (Mrs. Phillimore), a freshman adolescent mathematics major from Cuba; Michael Musolino Jr. (Sir Wilfred Cates-Darby), a freshman American Sign Language-English interpreting major from Durhamville; Sierra Lynch (Vida Phillimore), a senior psychology major from Watervliet; Caleigh Alterio (Cynthia Karslake), a senior occupational science major from Akron; Phil Atherlay (Sudley/Fiddler), a sophomore adolescent mathematics education major from Deposit; Alicia Brown (Jacqueline), a junior occupational science major from Kirkwood; and William Staub (Thomas), a freshman adolescent English major from Rochester. Justin Krog, program developer for the College’s Office of Information Technology Services (ITS), portrays Phillip Phillimore. Penn Yan resident Brian Cobb ’08, M’11 will return to his alma mater to portray Matthew Phillimore in the production. Cobb teaches English at Penn Yan Middle School. Pat Fegley, a Geneva resident who has worked with the Pennsylvania Yankee Theater Company (PYTCo), portrays John Karslake.

Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '15

Members of the crew include Marissa Rogers, a freshman psychology major from Pompton Plains (stage manager); Danica Zielinski, a senior American Sign Language major from Congers (costume designer); Dan Roach (sound designer); and Trish Ralph (lighting designer).

Ralph is chair of the Department of Theatre and Music Studies and an associate professor of theatre at SUNY Brockport, while Roach has worked with the Eastman Opera, Geva Theatre and Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, among others.

The April 10 performance will benefit the cast members’ annual trip to the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival. All tickets are $7 and will be sold at the door. Tickets for the other three performances are $5 for Keuka College students, faculty, staff, and alumni; and $10 for the general public. Seating is limited.

Pulitzer Prize Nominated Poet to Present Reading

Pulitzer Prize nominee Peter Makuck will read from his fiction and poetry Tuesday, April 1 at Keuka College.

Free and open to the public, the reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Gannett Room of Lightner Library.

Makuck earned a bachelor’s degree from St. Francis College and a Ph.D. in American literature from Kent State University. Makuck’s poetry collection, Long Lens: New & Selected Poems, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. His work has been featured on the Poetry Daily website and on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac.

Makuck’s latest collection of short stories, Allegiance and Betrayal, was published last year, and his previous collection, Costly Habits, was nominated for the Pen/Faulkner Award. He has received honorable mention in Best American Short Stories five times and his poetry collection, Pilgrims, earned the Zoe Kincaid Brockman Award for the best book of poems by a North Carolinian in 1989. Four years later, Makuck earned the Charity Randall Citation, awarded annually by the International Poetry Forum in Pittsburgh.

His poems, stories, and reviews have been published in such journals as Poetry, The Southern Review, The Gettysburg Review, the Yale Review, North American Review, and Ploughshares, the Sewanee Review, among others.

In addition to poetry, Makuck serves as emeritus professor of English at East Carolina University (ECU) in Greenville, N.C. Named a Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at ECU,  Makuck has also served as visiting writer in residence at Brigham Young University and visiting distinguished professor at North Carolina State University, where he also served as the Lee Smith Visiting Poet.

A former Fulbright Exchange Professor to France, Makuck served as juror for the annual Poet’s Prize and received the Brockman Award, given annually for the best collection of poetry by a North Carolinian. He has also contributed to the Raleigh News & Observer, North Carolina’s largest daily newspaper.

Full Steam Ahead for Music Program

With Keuka College’s fall Chorale and Band concert in the books, Kelley Hamilton, music instructor and director of the Chorale, has her sights set on the future of the music program.

And the future starts during the spring 2014 semester, when Hamilton will hold auditions for students who want to join a select choir.

Hamilton envisions the select choir performing at on-campus events, alumni gatherings, and traveling for student recruitment.

“It will be a polished, professional group that will showcase the College and give Keuka students a high-quality music experience,” said Hamilton, who plans to have the choir accompanied by live instrumentalists.

Hamilton, who has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) and other well-known groups, “likes to sing a lot of different genres, and I want to incorporate those genres into the choir.”

With that variety in mind, Hamilton anticipates the choir will sing “mostly pop, R&B, jazz, and Broadway, as well as present some a cappella pieces.”

Chorale member Jakiem Brown ’15, an educational studies major from Rochester, would seem to be a logical candidate for the select choir.

“Many of my best singers and musicians are athletes, and Jakiem is a member of both the men’s volleyball and tennis teams,” said Hamilton. “He plays the saxophone and ukulele, sings, and beat-boxes. He performed a solo during the concert, and is just a great kid who is hungry for more.”

Another athlete who would seem to a logical select choir candidate is Stephanie Havens ’14. The adolescent English major from Unadilla is a forward/midfielder for the women’s soccer team, and has been “singing and playing the trumpet for a long time.

“I liked that I could join Chorale or Band and have private voice lessons,” said Havens. “There is a Mozart piece I am working on that I am excited about, but is nothing I’d have ever considered if not for the voice lessons. I am not afraid to get up and sing in front of people anymore.”

Kelsea Flynn

As the select choir works through its formative stages, the popularity of the Chorale is growing, as evidenced by Kelsea Flynn ’17, a psychology major from Penn Yan. She sang a duet at the concert and “is excited to participate in Chorale next semester.”

“There are a lot of new students registered for Chorale next semester, and I’m excited,” said Hamilton. “There will be some challenges, though. I have several Chinese students registered, and a lot of students can’t read music. But, I hope to incorporate more popular songs into the concerts, and to one day partner with the Arion Players Drama Club and perform a musical.”

Next semester will also bring the formation of a jazz band, private instrumental lessons, and a possible concert with the Chinese Choral Society of Rochester.

“There are many Chinese students in the Keuka College Chorale and I wanted to find an authentic experience for them,” said Hamilton.

Also on tap for next semester will be new music opportunities in the classroom. Hamilton will teach a class on American Music Traditions, which will explore the history of American popular and classical music, including colonial folk music, blues,  jazz, Broadway, rap, and hip hop, among others.

Added Hamilton: “One of the things I hope to do is partner with [Assistant Professor of Art] Melissa Newcomb’s students in her digital photography class and have them design album covers for my students.”

Poet Juliana Gray in Spotlight

Award-winning poet Juliana Gray will read from her works Thursday, Oct. 3, as part of Keuka College’s Spotlight Series.

Free and open to the public, the reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Gannett Room of  Lightner Library.

Gray’s most recent chapbook, Anne Boleyn’s Sleeve, captured the  2013 Winged City Chapbook Press Poetry Chapbook Contest. All of the poems in the collection are written in the voice of Anne Boleyn.

A faculty member  at the Sewanee Young Writers’ Conference from 2000 -2011, Gray is the author of two poetry collections including Roleplay, which won the 2010 Orphic Prize. Her chapbook, History in Bones, won the Wick Chapbook competition in 2001. Gray’s first book of poetry, The Man Under My Skin, was published in 2005.

Her poems have appeared in such literary journals as The Hopkins Review, New South, River Styx, The Tampa Review, and 32 Poems, among others. Her poems have also been featured in several poetry anthologies including Bright Wings: An Illustrated Anthology of Poems About Birds, Whatever Remembers Us: An Anthology of Alabama Poets, Stories from the Blue Moon Cafe III: Anthology of Southern Writers, The Next of Us Is About to Be Born, and The Wick Poetry Series Anthology in Celebration of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Wick Poetry Center.

Her non-fiction poetry has also been selected for publication in River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative, and Cornbread Nation 2: The United States of Barbecue.

A native of Alabama, Gray is an associate professor of English at Alfred University. She earned her bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Alabama, master’s degree in English and creative writing from the University of Tennessee, and  doctorate in English and creative writing from the University of Cincinnati