Skip to content

Posts Tagged ‘doug richards’

Partnering for a Good Read

"Butch" and Will Staub review the story Staub wrote about Butch.

“Butch,” a fifth-grader at Penn Yan Elementary School, didn’t like reading.

But thanks to a three-week partner project where Keuka College students met one-on-one with schoolchildren to craft a personal story from the child’s perspective, it wasn’t long before he changed his mind. So says Butch’s new buddy and personal “author,” Keuka freshman Will Staub.

“Butch told me the first day he didn’t like reading, then the next week he showed me this book he’d read,” Staub described. In truth, it was more like Butch raced to Staub’s side, book in hand, thrusting it into view and leaning forward in eager anticipation for the response.

Amanda Markessinis reads "Riley" the story she wrote for her.

Watching the interaction – and others like it across 17 such pairs of college and elementary students – were Dr. Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English at Keuka, and fifth-grade teacher Terry Test, herself a 1973 Keuka graduate. The two teamed together, with support from elementary principal Edward Foote, to enable the collegiate “authors” to craft a three-page story from the perspective of each child selected from the joint classroom Test shares with team teacher Rebecca Morse.

The project, dubbed “Who is Penn Yan?,” was the final assignment for Joiner’s Literature in the Wider World course, a new introductory English course in Keuka’s general education curriculum. The course was designed to highlight the focus the English program is placing on literature as the doorway to culture, society, community and more.  Over the course of three weeks, each college student spent time getting to know his or her child, and ultimately, learning more about Penn Yan through the child’s eyes or imagination.

The fifth-graders all chose character names for themselves and wore name tags to each session, where partners paired up, using whatever chairs, tables, floor space, gym mats, or window ledges were available to continue their conversations.

“Look at the dynamics of this,” Test said, gesturing around the room at the pairs. “The ‘I’m too cool to do this’ vibe just shattered in the first second, and my students are real, being true to themselves. The energy is here on all sides. I’m so impressed at Dr. Joiner’s scaffolding of this.”

To say the children were thrilled would be an understatement. Some brought sketches, notebooks, origami, and more to share with their college author during the second and third sessions. A handful of boys could be seen half out of their seats, leaning forward to dialogue with their authors, while other children were seated more casually, body positions mimicking the college students taking detailed notes.

Tissania Cohall works with "Maddie."

Watching from a few steps away each week, Test and Joiner were almost as excited as their students at the energy generated during the interactions, and the impact it had on student learning.  By the end of the first week’s session, when alerting everyone in the room that only two minutes were left on the clock, Joiner said she could tell the project was en route to success.

“Every student – big and little – turned around and went ‘awww’ in disappointment,” Joiner said. “Some of my students who are not as vocal in class totally engaged with the children. It was just a cool thing.”

Test said the impact on her fifth-graders was almost immediate. (more…)

Joiner Tasked for Digital Faulkner Project

The imaginary county in Mississippi that William Faulkner fashioned to serve as the foundation for his fiction will come to vivid, online life in a new digital humanities project involving some two dozen Faulkner scholars from around the country – including Dr. Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English at Keuka College.

“Dr. Joiner’s participation in this important and prestigious digital humanities project promises to raise Keuka’s profile significantly in the field of digital scholarship,” said Doug Richards, professor of English and chair of the Division  of Humanities and Fine Arts.

Over the next three to five years, Faulkner scholars will collaborate to translate the characters, timelines, dialogue and events of his short stories and novels into interactive online maps that help readers visualize and glean new insights into Faulkner’s works. According to Joiner, Faulkner himself drew a map of Yoknapatawpha indicating locations and events portrayed in his stories.

“He considered it his little postage stamp of native soil of which he was sole owner and proprietor. Thus, this project is  attempting to digitalize his fiction and expand on his mapping,” Joiner explained.

Stephen Railton, professor of English at the University of Virginia, is directing the project and invited Joiner to come aboard in late August. This fall Joiner will team with Taylor Hagood, associate professor of English at Florida Atlantic University, to map a short story “The Unvanquished” (later revised and known as “Riposte in Tertio”), first published in The Saturday Evening Post as part of a 1934 series. Joiner and Hagood are facing a year-end deadline to finish digital mapping of the short story and then, Joiner will be assigned to a team mapping one of Faulkner’s 15 novels.

william faulkner, digital yoknapatawpha, humanities project, neh grant

William Faulkner illustration Courtesy Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia

The project, which received a nearly $60,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), builds upon a 2011 Yoknapatawpha map prototype created by the University of Virginia Library’s Digital Media Lab. The NEH grant was one of 23 awarded through its start-up program to promote progress in the digital humanities. Back in 1957-58, Faulkner held the university’s first writer-in-residence post, so the current online archive includes nearly 30 hours of audio recordings of public readings or remarks he gave, according to a news article from the Virginia website.

According to the website, the project centers on the 15 novels and 48 stories Faulkner wrote between 1926 and 1960 and set in Yoknapatawpha. The prototype models a way to enter every character, location and event from separate works into a robust database that  then maps that data into an atlas of interactive visual resources, according to the demands of each particular story. Ultimately, the entire body of Yoknapatawpha fiction would be linked together in new, cumulative maps enabling scholars or students to study, for example, all black inhabitants and the roles they play in Faulkner’s works, or his representations of violence, religion, or family, the site indicates. (more…)

Art and Design Comes to Keuka

art, design, degree, new major, keukaKeuka College has received approval from the New York State Department of Education to offer a major in art and design beginning in the fall 2013 semester.

The major is geared toward students interested in design, visual expression, and digital communication.

doug richards, humanities and fine arts, professor

Richards

Keuka’s program provides “practical, career-entered advising and experiences” that a recent national report on education in the arts recommends, “including a first-year introduction to the principles and practices of building a professional portfolio and a stand-alone, upper-level seminar focused on “Art in the World,”’ said Doug Richards, professor of English and chair of the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts.

“While fostering creative development and personal expression, the major provides the skills and experiences essential for success in the field of design and visual communication. The program’s enhanced emphasis on digital media and graphic design will open up cutting edge opportunities for students as they transition to the workforce or advanced study,” said Richards.

Students may choose to pursue a stand-alone, core-major program in art and design, or an art and design major with any of the following concentrations: advertising/marketing, communication, digital graphic design, small business/entrepreneurship, studio art, theatre arts, and verbal arts.

Newcomb

“The new program has more of a design influence, and reflects that there is more interest in digital media,” said Melissa Newcomb, assistant professor of art. “However, students will not be limited to design, and will learn layout, digital publishing and how to build their portfolios.”

As the “artistic community” at Keuka grows, Newcomb believes there will be more opportunities for students to share their work on campus, build their portfolios, and enhance their marketable skills.

Added Newcomb: “Ever since I arrived at Keuka, I’ve had this big dream of where I want to take the art program. I feel very good about where it is going.”

To explore any of Keuka’s academic programs, request more information.

Lit Classes with a Different View

Kelsey Harmer presents her final project. (Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '16)

Dr. Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English at Keuka College, is putting a new twist on some classic short stories, sonnets, plays and prose.

Joiner introduced a new course this fall, Literature in the Wider World, which serves as the new introduction to the major. It seeks to expand student horizons on books, reading, writing and all-things English and to grasp the role literature plays in everyday life.

Professor of English Doug Richards, chair of the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts, visited Joiner’s class and shared a real-life example of how English can play a role in careers beyond writing and teaching. According to Richards, a graduate of Keuka’s organizational communication program was on a sales call “that was going nowhere” but  took a positive turn when the prospective client referenced the medieval poem, Beowulf. The Keuka graduate was able to build on the allusion in conversation, earn the client’s respect, and make the sale.

Megan Hall listens to Dr. Doug Richards share stories of English in real-life settings.

“You will know the stories of your culture and can engage in intelligent conversation and you’ll get further along,” advised Richards. “Keep working on building links and connections.”

And that is what the students did in Joiner’s class. They studied some classics, among them Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116, and short stories, such as Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” and Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper. However, more than simple context and content were discussed. In addition to reading the traditional works, students also investigated digital and other media formats, and even theatrical and cinematic formats, in the case of Susan Glaspell’s play Trifles, and Fitzgerald’s classic, The Great Gatsby.

Joiner discusses digital vs. traditional formats with students. (Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '16)

While digital technology has had a significant impact on the written word, students debate more than just print-versus-e-book preferences. One challenge Joiner gave students is to consider literature as hypertext, the embedded digital links to prior electronic postings. In the final assignment, for example, the autobiographical “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,” a popular treatise against slavery, students reviewed the Biblical story of Daniel in the lions’ den. They then analyzed a portion of the work where Douglass describes his newfound freedom as escaping the hungry mouth of the lions.

While on its own, the reference makes literal sense, Joiner said, “it’s a hypertext without links and we have to be aware there’s a link, so how do we fill that in? We can read [literally] without understanding the allusion but what if we do? All of a sudden it takes on this whole new meaning and how does it help [Douglass] make [his] argument? His audience would have understood that [allusion] and we, today, may not.”

Douglass’s “Narrative” contains several other Biblical and secular allusions, which students further analyzed in their final class project, where they could choose their own creative medium to demonstrate the knowledge gleaned in their studies. While some students presented digital essays using literal hyperlinks and hypertext, others chose creative mediums – digital and traditional – to share what they learned.

Part of Jackson's Prezi display on Frederick Douglass

For example, freshman Brianna Jackson of Syracuse used a multi-dimensionsal software known as Prezi, which some have compared to PowerPoint on steroids, to present a 3-D, visual display of quotes, images, colors and more. Two students, sophomore Jake Banas and junior Justin Hess wrote fictional stories, with Banas “writing a story about writing my paper,” while Hess reverted to the classic detective-reporter serial, turning the research into clues to decipher the mystery.

Meanwhile, sophomore Tyler Hixson of Shortsville created a Facebook persona for Douglass, posting photos available in the public domain, as well as links to facts and figures relative to Douglass, then “friending” the real Facebook accounts of fellow students in the class. He also created a Twitter account using the handle FreddyDouglass17.

Tyler Hixson displays a Facebook profile for Frederick Douglass. (Photo by Stephanie Lockhart '16)

Joiner asked students to compare and contrast pros and cons of each format or medium.

While sophomore Judy Ludwig of Rochester merged the traditional term paper with hypertext, she  “came to the conclusion that you needed both – neither the hypertext nor the traditional paper did everything you needed it to do,” explained Joiner.

Similarly, Jackson’s Prezi slideshow was visually appealing, “but in terms of something that can stand on its own, this won’t work – we need you to fill in the blanks,” Joiner described.

Employees Honored at Community Day

Forty-nine faculty and staff members were recognized for their service and dedication to Keuka College at Community Day Aug. 20.

Keuka College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, second from right, poses with five-year service award recipients.

Five-year service awards were presented to: Eva Moberg-Sarver, director of student activities/associate director of New Student Orientation; Doreen Hovey, executive assistant to the vice president for academic affairs; Jonathan Accardi, director of campus recreation; Christopher Leahy, associate professor of history; Andrew Robak, assistant professor of chemistry; Patricia Mattingly, assistant professor of nursing; Jennifer Mealy, assistant professor of social work; Kimberly Fenton, interlibrary loan librarian; Joshua Ficks, manager of TeamWorks!; Judy Gilmartin, administrative programmer; John Locke, director of instructional design and multidisciplinary studies; Kathleen Snow, academic skills counselor; Marjorie Multer, administrative assistant, admissions; Julie Burns-Percy, assistant professor of social work, Accelerated Studies for Adults Program (ASAP); Jessica Noveck, student services representative; Chevanne DeVaney, director of multicultural affairs; Teri Spoor, IKON site manager; Craig Gelder, manager, Follett Bookstore; Terry Reape, dining services; Korey Goodman, dining services; Steven Riekofski, maintenance; and Sue Morse, housekeeping.

Keuka College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, second from right, poses with 10-year service award recipients.

Ten-year service awards were presented to Tim Sellers, associate vice president for academic affairs; Vicki Smith, chair and professor of occupational therapy; Tom Tremer, chair and professor of criminology/criminal justice; Anna Decker, secretary, education graduate studies and administrative assistant, Lightner Library; Sharon Tyler, associate professor and librarian; and Susan DeLyser, human resource manager.

Fifteen-year service awards were presented to Jean Wannall, professor of occupational therapy; Anne Weed, vice president of academic affairs; Brad Turner, technical support technician; Kathy Waye, executive director of alumni and family relations; and Kasey Klingensmith, professor of biology.

A 20-year service award was presented to Jeff Bray, assistant director of athletics and head athletic trainer.

Twenty-five year service awards were presented to Doug Richards, chair and professor of English; and Sherry Fox, accounts payable.

College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera and Professor of Biology Joan Magnusen.

Tom Carroll, professor of chemistry and physics (left) with College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera.

Thirty-year service awards were presented to Tom Carroll, professor of chemistry and physics; and Joan Magnusen, professor of biology.

Merit awards were presented to: Laura Alfieris, assistant director of admissions; Carroll; Rachel E. Dewey, communications specialist; Kathleen Hastings, assistant director of admissions counseling; Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English; Kelly Lickert, head coach, women’s lacrosse; Eugene Mont, resident director, Ball Hall and retention counselor; Tim White, resident director, Blyley and Harrington Halls and retention counselor; and Penny Webber, office manager for Academic Success at Keuka (ASK).

College President Díaz-Herrera (center) with Tracy McFarland (left) and Christen Accardi.

Two Presidential Awards for Sustained Outstanding Achievement were presented to Christen Accardi, marketing manager, ASAP; and Tracy McFarland, associate vice president for student development.

New Minor Going Green

In search of inspiration to develop a proposal for a minor in environmental studies, Doug Richards spent some time in the Vermont woods during his spring 2007 sabbatical.

Two years later, he took students in his Environmental Literature (ENG 215) class to the woods near campus in hopes of inspiring them.

(more…)

A Minor with Major Impact

It didn’t take long for Professor of English Doug Richards to achieve his goal of starting an environmental studies program at Keuka.

During his spring 2007 sabbatical, Richards spent time in the Middlebury (Vt.) College library and in “the woods” with that goal in mind. Middlebury College is known for having one of the best environmental studies programs in the country.

(more…)

Help Wanted: Must Be Environmentally Literate

Professor of English Doug Richards’ goal is to get an environmental studies program—“be it a concentration, minor or major”—started at Keuka.

That’s why he “spent five months in the Middlebury (Vt.) College library—which has one of the leading programs in environmental studies in the country—and in the woods, learning more about my home ground” during his sabbatical last semester.

(more…)