Skip to content

Posts Tagged ‘faculty’

OT Faculty, Graduates Impress at National Conference

Four Keuka College faculty from the Division of Occupational Therapy and two graduates of the master’s program in occupational therapy wowed professional occupational therapists (OTs) with peer-reviewed presentations at the National American Occupational Therapy Association Conference in Nashville, April 16-19. In addition, nine current OT majors attended the conference, gaining exposure to professional development and new research within the field.

“There were over 9,000 OT’s in attendance,” said Dr. Vicki Smith, division chair and professor of occupational therapy. “All our topics were current to present clinical and academic practice. All our topics were a hit.”

Dr. Smith and Dr. Michele Bennett, assistant professor of occupational therapy, participated in a peer review presentation, “Big Fish from Small Academic Ponds: Preparing Students for Primary Care,” along with representatives from Ithaca College, St Francis University, and the University of Findlay.

Workshop presenters sharing the podium with Dr. Vicki Smith, center, and Dr. Michele Bennett, second from right.

According to Smith, the collaborative “Big Fish” presentation focused on how each of the four institutions prepares OT students for the changes in clinical practice due to the Affordable Care Act. Within that context, Smith and Bennett highlighted the Keuka College approach of expanding clinical education placement of OT students into community-based fieldwork locations.

In the last two years, Smith said “we have accrued more than 50 nontraditional and community-based sites where our students can gain new hands-on skills to meet future health care needs.”

Dr. Vicki Smith presents during the panel. Dr. Bennett is seated, center.

Among those sites are assisted living communities, home health care agencies, migrant worker programs, palliative care homes like Keuka Comfort Care, organizations such as the Literacy Volunteers of Ontario or Yates Counties, Syracuse Rescue Mission and businesses such as Wegmans.

According to Smith, the representatives from Ithaca focused on their students’ use of technology with older adults and needs assessment for the ‘well-elderly’ population. Those from St. Francis emphasized adult dayhab programming, research and missions work, while OT students at Findlay have been offering supervised OT programs in partnership with the prison system, working with inmates along the range of incarceration to community re-entry and probation.

“We are all small schools and this is how we get our clinical experiences done to prepare future practitioners,” Smith said.

Dr. Bennett and Dr. Battaglia's poster presentation.

During the conference, Dr. Bennett and Dr. Carmela Battaglia, professor of occupational therapy, also presented a poster presentation on “Designing Learning Objectives and Activities for Achieving Measurable Student Outcomes.”

“What Carmela and Michele did was excellent,” Smith said, describing how the duo presented an electronic process for evaluating the strength of the occupational therapy curriculum through a more extensive use of Moodle, the College’s online course delivery channel.

“Instead of students just posting assignments into Moodle, they collected additional data based on the outcomes of everything the students submit,” Smith explained. As a result, the integrated data helps provide a more accurate measure of the learning outcomes of the curriculum, she described.

In addition, Dr. Holly Preston, associate professor of occupational therapy, and 2014 OT master’s graduates Matt Nowak and Kacie Horoszewski presented “Validity and Reliability of an iPod Forearm Goniometer App” as another poster presentation. Preston, Nowak and Horoszewski previously presented their collaborative research at the end of Nowak and Horoszewski’s graduate year of study, sharing it at a research summit hosted at SUNY Brockport with other colleges.

Dr. Holly Preston, left, Kacie Horoszewski, and Matt Nowak gave a poster presentation on their research on a mobile app that measures joint and muscle flexibility.

Traditionally, a physical tool is used to measure the joint and/or muscle flexibility of a patient, such as  forearm or elbow movements. Their work tested the reliability of using a handheld mobile device running the Apple-based mobile app. Research like this potentially could replace the traditional tool, with measurements taken by the app as the patient moves his or her arm while holding the device.

According to Nowak, “we measure joint angles a lot when doing therapy. We found this app and we found there hadn’t been any recent research on it when we did our review. We know Dr. Preston was interested in this research, so we thought she was a great asset and could help guide us through the experimental process a little better, given that she was already versed in it.”

“We were very well received at a national conference, and it was very validating to have people from all of the U.S. contact us and seek our research out,” said Nowak, who now works full-time as a licensed OT in the Auburn area with Lifetime Care, a home care agency based in Rochester.

Dr. Dianne Trickey-Rokenbrod, Dr. Vicki Smith, back row, left, and Dr. Michele Bennett, front row, second from right, with student members of the Keuka College Alpha Sigma chapter of Phi Theta Epsilon, the honor society of the American Occupational Therapy Foundation.

Horoszewski added that it was exciting to have other OT colleagues at the conference “seek out our poster, ask thought- provoking questions and encourage us to conduct a follow up study with the most current Apple technology available.”

“Overall, the experience has given me the confidence to pursue further research opportunities in the clinic and seek additional collaborations with the Keuka College occupational therapy program in the future,” said Horoszewski, who is now working as a licensed OT in a geriatric rehabilitation center outside of Ann Arbor, Michigan.

“As an OT graduate, this was my first professional presentation, and I think it went it great,” Nowak said, crediting the numerous pre-professional experiences gleaned through his Keuka College career to set the stage for success.

“Field Period™ was the first thing and the actual experiences of getting out in the professional world on our breaks from school – that was a big part of it, the experiential learning. Having to do multiple presentations throughout my college career really set us up to do that presentation too,” Nowak added. “The faculty and staff in the OT division served us pretty well and they were able to get us all ready to be entry-level professionals in our field.”

Three Faculty Promoted, Granted Tenure

Three faculty members were promoted and granted tenure by the Board of Trustees at its recent winter meeting.

Promoted from assistant to associate professor (effective August 2013) and granted tenure (effective August 2014) were Dr. Patricia Mattingly, Jennifer Mealey, and Dr. Andrew Robak.

Patricia Mattingly

Mattingly, a resident of Aurora, also serves as curriculum coordinator in the baccalaureate nursing program. She is a member of the Faculty Liaison Committee, College Advisory Council, and chairs the Sigma Theta Tau, Upsilon Upsilon Governance Committee. She served on the Nursing Faculty Search Committee, Presidential Inauguration Committee, and Diversity Task Force.

She came to Keuka in 2007 after serving as a pediatric nurse practitioner and lactation consultant at Northeast Pediatrics in Ithaca.

Mattingly is a member of the Onondaga Community College and Cayuga Community College School of Nursing advisory boards, and the Cayuga County Department of Health’s Utilization Review Board. She is certified as a pediatric nurse practitioner and is a member of the New York State Association of Nurse Practitioners, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and Sigma Theta Tau National Nursing Honor Society.

A consultant in homeopathy, Mattingly delivered a presentation last March at Driving the Future 12: Kent State University Annual Nursing Conference. She also presented at the September 2011 Sigma Theta Tau Consortium Research Event, and the October 2010 National League for Nursing Education Summit.

She holds a Doctor of Nursing Practice from Robert Morris University, Master of Science in nursing from the University of Maryland at Baltimore, and Bachelor of Science in nursing from George Mason University.

Jennifer Mealey

Mealey, field director for the social work program, served as an adjunct instructor of social work before joining the full-time faculty in 2007. She is also a therapist for Educational Resource Associates.

Formerly a clinical supervisor at Hillside Children’s Center, Mealey was a clinical supervisor and diagnostic clinical social worker at KidsPeace, Seneca Woods Campus, and a shelter/hotline domestic violence counselor at Alternatives for Battered Women.

In addition to her teaching duties, Mealey is a member of the Curriculum Committee, Spiritual Life Advisory Board, serves as a faculty coach, leads the College’s Veterans Initiative, and advises the Association of Future Social Workers club. A member of the Middle States Working Group from 2010-12, she was a member and team leader of the Native American Traditions Ad-Hoc Committee.

She earned a Master of Social Work from the Greater Rochester Collaborative MSW Program and a Bachelor of Science in social work from Keuka College.

Mealey resides in Farmington with her husband, Geoff, and daughter, Saige.

Andy Robak

Robak, who resides in Penn Yan, joined the Keuka faculty in 2007.  He teaches Organic Chemistry and lab sections, is the General Chemistry lab instructor, teaches the eight-week experiential learning course, and Science in Popular Culture.

Chair of the Faculty Development Committee in 2009-10, he serves as Chemistry Club adviser, pre-health adviser, and research adviser in the Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Physical Education.

In September 2011, Robak presented on The Art of Chemistry—an independent study by Kat Andonucci ’14 that he directed—at the Corning Section of the American Chemical Society meeting. Showcasing spectacular photographs of chemistry experiments, the project garnered coverage in Chemical and Engineering News, a national publication, and was featured in a Lightner Gallery exhibit.

Robak also developed green chemistry experiments for home-schooled high school students.

He holds a Ph.D. and Master of Science in chemistry from the University of Oregon, and a Bachelor of Science in chemistry/environmental chemistry from RIT.

Meet New Faculty: Samuel Bateman

Editor’s Note: This is the seventh in a series of profiles of new, full-time faculty who have recently joined the Keuka community.

New to the Keuka faculty this fall in the Accelerated Studies for Adults Program (ASAP) is Samuel Bateman, who is teaching classes in managerial accounting, managerial finances and decision-making to students in both the bachelor’s and master’s degree management programs.

The Colorado transplant is completing a transition to full-time academia after spending nearly 30 years in software sales, business development and international sales and marketing. Starting in 2005, Bateman began teaching part-time at North Carolina Wesleyan College and Wake-Forest University. He next taught online and international business courses for Lock Haven University in Pennsylvania, as well as some international business classes for the undergraduate program at Walden University, which operates online programs from headquarters in Minnesota.

Bateman, now a Rochester resident, holds two master’s degrees – one in public and international affairs from the University of Pittsburgh, and an MBA from North Carolina State University.

“I’ll be able to relate to the ASAP students because I obtained both of my master’s degrees while working full-time,” Bateman said. (more…)

“Fired Up” President Outlines Vision at Inauguration

Saying that “we are obliged to reconsider a liberal arts education in a digital, connected world,” Keuka College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera today (May 4) set  the College on a path to become “the cradle for the next generation of scientists and humanists.”

In remarks after being invested as the College’s 19th president, Dr. Díaz-Herrera encouraged the faculty of this “great institution to create the liberal arts curriculum for the 21st century.

See what President Díaz-Herrera had to say about his inauguration.

“What if we were to integrate computational methods seamlessly across the curriculum?” said the president, a native of Barquisimeto, Venezuela. “What if we were to produce criminal justice experts who solved cybercrime, nurses proficient in medical informatics, and English majors fluent in digital storytelling?”

Reaffirming the College’s historical commitment to the liberal arts, the president disagreed with those who question the value of a liberal arts education because graduates can’t find jobs.

Watch the full inauguration

“A liberal arts education provides its own rewards and combined with our Field Period innovation is a superb preparation for the world of work and service,” he said. “A liberal arts foundation is good for the economy and for democracy.”

Even highly technical jobs require a high degree of intellectual skills and contextual understanding, said the president, who pointed to Google, which is hiring 6,000 new employees this year, 5,000 from the liberal arts or humanities.

Dr. Melissa Brown '72, chair of the Board of Trustees, invests Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera as the 19th president of Keuka College.

“As the late Steve Jobs said, ‘Technical skills are not enough,’” said Díaz-Herrera, contrasting what Daniel Pink, chief speechwriter for former Vice President Al Gore, calls conceptual workers vs. knowledge workers. “Conceptual workers are anchored in the liberal arts—strong in science, math, and humanities, plus technology.”

An education with a liberal arts base “allows us to be able to address difficult, global, complex issues by allowing us to place this knowledge in context without compartmentalization,” said Díaz-Herrera. “This is an education that unique places like Keuka can provide, and it’s one of the reasons that drew me to the job.”

Although the president has spent a good deal of time “ascertaining the hopes, dreams, and concerns” of the College community, he also spearheaded a campus-wide, long-range strategic planning effort. One of the first outcomes of that work is a new mission statement:

Keuka College exists to create citizens and leaders to serve the world in the 21st century.

Among the many topics being discussed during the on-going strategic planning process is the arts.

“We must bring the arts back to Keuka College,” said the president. “Conversations are under way with the Eastman School of Music to see what we can do together. Another exciting project is the potential reviving of the Sampson Theatre in downtown Penn Yan. We should be part of this effort and also participate wholeheartedly in the Penn Yan 20/20 planning effort. The Finger Lakes Museum is another project that plays in this arena.”

Díaz-Herrera pledged to “enthusiastically give my full dedication to the College in the only way I know: with passion and firmness. You can be sure that I will put my heart and soul toward moving this institution to the next level.”

But the president said a team effort is required to reach that level.

“Resilient academic institutions succeed because their faculty, staff, students, and friends are strongly committed to them,” he said. “I will need your total commitment, and I will work hard on building confidence and trust to achieve the solidarity needed to address difficult and changing times.”

In the discussions he has had with members of the College community during his 10 months on the job, Díaz-Herrera said one thing resonates loud and clear.

“Our community is passionate about this place,” he said, “and I must confess that the enthusiasm is contagious. I am fired up!”

To view a brief album of photos from the Inauguration, click HERE.

English Professor Wins Professional Development Award

Just because you’ve got a Ph.D. doesn’t mean you stop learning.

That’s the perspective of Jennie Joiner, assistant professor of English, and winner of the 2010-11 Excellence in Academic Achievement award, given by the College’s Office of Academic Affairs. The award recognizes Keuka faculty members who have demonstrated to their colleagues an exceptional commitment to advance the knowledge base of their academic or professional field.

Within the realm of literature, Joiner’s interest includes depictions of masculinity, with a focus on the writings of William Faulkner. Her doctorate, from the University of Kansas, focused on the subject of marriage and masculinity in Faulkner’s fiction.  Here at Keuka, Joiner created a senior seminar course last spring focusing on the fiction of Faulkner and Toni Morrison. The course followed the presentation of her paper, “William Faulkner’s Hearth and Toni Morrison’s Oven: The Slow Burn of Masculinity in Go Down, Moses and Paradise,” in October 2010 at a scholarly conference on Faulkner and Morrison held in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

Not only was the class well-received by students, but a longer version of Joiner’s paper was solicited by an editor of the Faulkner Journal and published in August of this year. Another paper of hers, “Constructing Black Sons: Faulkner’s ‘Barn Burning’ and O’Connor’s ‘The Artificial Nigger,” was solicited by the Flannery O’Connor Review last year and published in the 2010 volume. She is already at work on a new manuscript that examines Faulkner’s sexual geographies, or the relationship between place, cultural institutions and sexuality.

“I don’t think students always recognize we have our own research agendas as well. Part of being a faculty member is continuing to be a student and continuing my own education. It doesn’t stop with a Ph.D.,” she said. “What you learn with a Ph.D. is how to keep doing your own research.” (more…)