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Top Student, Boss Honored

Eight students were nominated for Keuka College's 2015 Student Employee of the Year, including from left: Brittany Kuhn, Tyler Redington, Savannah Fuller, Zach Ward, Sini Ngobese, Connor Delavak, and Courtney Nojeim. (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

A “pillar in the athletics department” and a “friend who changes student lives for the better” were the respective recipients of the 2015 Student Employee and Work-Study Supervisor of the Year awards at the Student Employment Awards Luncheon April 15.

Senior psychology major Connor Delavak and Co-Curricular Transcript Coordinator and Community Service Coordinator Valerie Webster were selected by two separate panels of judges.

Delavak, nominated for the award by Jeff Bray, associate director of athletics and head athletic trainer, has worked as a student athletic trainer for four years, and the longer Bray has been at Keuka College, the more increasingly selective he has become of those he chooses to hire as his work-study students.

Connor Delavak and Jeff Bray. (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

In 23 years of supervising student employees, Bray says senior Delavak ranks in his top five, touting his demeanor and sincerity for setting him apart. In fact, Bray says Delavak has become a pillar within the athletics department.

“He has a tremendous grasp on what is expected of him and the role he plays within our department,” said Bray, adding Delavak is part of the fabric of the athletic training staff and the athletic department. “It has gotten to the point that when we are scheduled to depart for a weekend road trip, I simply ask him if we are ‘all set’ and he replies with a very confident ‘yes sir.’ He truly cares about the job that he does and it shows every time he works.”

And Bray does not hesitate to say that Delavak is a “tremendous asset” to the athletics department.

“I believe there is added responsibility that comes with that,” said Bray. “Connor has always represented himself, our department, and Keuka College in a positive and professional manner. In fact, there are times that our coaches forget that he is a student and not a full time staff member.”

Added Bray: “I think we often take for granted the importance and the impact our student employees have on our campus. With Connor, he is a respected member of my staff. I feel fortunate to have played a small role in his collegiate experience.” 

The other student nominees were Tyler Redington, Brittany Kuhn, Ethan Eschler, Savannah Fuller, Courtney Nojeim, Sini Ngobese, and Zach Ward.

“All of our student employees are winners, but the eight nominees are the cream of the crop,” said Sally Daggett, human resources manager. “I thank all of the nominators who took time to nominate your student employee. It sends a powerful message to those students, as it tells of the importance of them in your lives.” 

Savannah Fuller and Valerie Webster (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

Webster was one of five work-study supervisors nominated for the award. She was nominated by occupational science major Savannah Fuller.

In the three years senior Fuller has worked in the Community Service Resource Office as a Community Service Advocate, she said Webster has pushed her to think outside of the box and find new ways to reach out to others.

“Upon accepting this job three years ago to help pay for college, I had no idea the true wealth I would gain from Valerie,” said Fuller. “Over this time we have established a strong working relationship, and she is a phenomenal work-study supervisor.”

That’s because Webster “provides each of us with appropriate guidance and leadership to help us grow and be successfully independent in our roles as a work-study students,” said Fuller. “No matter what challenges life presents Valerie with, she always given her work-study students 100 percent.”

After commencement, Fuller believes that the friendship she and Webster share, as well as the dedication to each of their communities, will last beyond her work-study position and long after her graduation from Keuka College.

Added Fuller: “The impact Valerie has had on my life, and the lives of countless other students, is invaluable and transcendent. Valerie has a way of changing student’s lives for the better. It has been an honor to work with her.”

The other supervisor nominees were John Boccacino (sports information director), Rachel Dewey (communications specialist), Carol Sackett (library circulation supervisor), and Xong Sony Yang (international student advisor).

From left: Rachel Dewey, Sony Yang, John Boccacino, Valerie Webster, and Carol Sackett. (photo by Abigail Oderman '18)

“It is an honor for me to talk to you at this luncheon, as it is one of my favorite events of the year,” said Jim Blackburn, vice president of student development. “The work student employees perform is immeasurable. Keuka College employees 511 students in 814 jobs. That is the equivalent of 150,000 hours of work per year—enough for 134 additional full-time positions. So, Keuka College students do a massive amount of work.”

Each of the nominees was recognized at the luncheon by his or her nominator and presented with a gift. The names of the student and supervisor award recipients will be added to two separate plaques housed in the Center for Experiential Learning. The Student Employee of the Year plaque is hung up in the winner’s work-study location until the following year’s awards luncheon.

More photos from the 2015 Student Employee of the Year Luncheon can be found here.

Spirits High on Special Day

On the far side of the court, between two sets of bleachers, several cheerleaders—some sporting white jerseys, others maroon – wave pom-poms. Just like the student athletes cruising the basketball court at Keuka College, they are represented by a mix of special needs students and their fellow classmates. It doesn’t matter which side scores, which student makes a basket or catches a pass, the cheers continue and the pom-poms keep on waving.

Penn Yan unified players warm up on the court

This is the spirit of the Special Olympics, where children with various physical and developmental disabilities play sports simply for love of the game. And Wednesday, that spirit was in full force as third to sixth graders at the Penn Yan and Dundee school districts met on the basketball courts at the Weed Physical Arts Center for the first-annual Special Olympics Unified Sports tournament. The event was sponsored by the College’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, with a number of SAAC members volunteering to help organize, officiate and run the tourney.

Two unified, or mixed, teams from each school competed, with the Penn Yan students sporting blue or orange jerseys while the Dundee teams boasted maroon or white uniforms. After the backdrop of rock music during pre-game warm-ups, each team was announced to the fans in the bleachers, jogging onto the court and lining up in rows in front of reserve team seats– just like high school and college teams. Vice President of Student Affairs Jim Blackburn welcomed the crowd and the athletes to the tourney, sharing the motto of the Special Olympics:

“Let me win,” Blackburn recited from memory. “But if I cannot win, let me at least be brave in the attempt.”

Teachers, administrators, classmates and families of the Special Olympians from each district were on hand to support the unified teams, with smartphones and cameras at the ready. In the top row of bleachers, classmates from the third-grade integrated classroom at Dundee, held up signs, cheering loudly for the athletes on the court below.

“The entire class petitioned to come – they wanted to support their classmates,” said Dundee Superintendent Laurie Hopkins-Halbert, a 1990 graduate of Keuka College. “They made signs and they’re yelling for their teams.”

Hopkins-Halbert said just the looks on the faces of the Special Olympians when they caught a pass or made a basket were a thrill to see.

“They have been so pumped to do this – and it’s an opportunity they don’t usually get. They have worked so hard at practice, and have put a lot of time into this. It is so exciting to see our kids out here,” she said. “Our regular students who are here have been phenomenal models and teachers for our [special needs] students as well. It’s just a win-win for everybody.”

Speaking of win-wins, at the Dundee team bench, wheelchair-bound third-grader William Smith met David Hull, who is also in a wheelchair. Hull is a 2012 graduate of the Keuka College DRIVE program, (diversity, responsibility, inclusion, vision, and experiential learning), which is a collaboration between the Yates County ARC, the College and Penn Yan Central School District. The DRIVE program provides 18-21-year-old special education students an opportunity to assimilate into the college environment and explore their personal goals.

“It’s awesome – honestly, I think I’m smiling more than they are out there,” said Mike Wainwright ’15, an occupational science major at the College, who volunteered to serve as a referee, and hopes to work with the special needs population as an occupational therapist after graduation. “It’s a rewarding experience to see the love of the game and smiles on everybody’s faces.”

More smiles appear on the court, as an attendant in a yellow volunteer T-shirt pushes William’s wheelchair, while William carries the ball in his lap. The pair make a pass to teammate Trey Brown, wearing No. 10 for the white Dundee team, and Trey makes a two-point basket. As Trey’s personal aide, also in a yellow T-shirt, lifts her arms in a V-sign for “victory,” the crowd in the stands goes wild. As the 10-minute half draws to a close, the crowd begins the countdown and the cheers erupt again.

During a snack break between games, Trey Brown joins his family on the bleachers, snacking on a cookie. Asked how he’s enjoying the tournament, Trey laughs and smiles in delight. “It was good, playing with William Smith in my class, and having friends here to watch,” translates Trey’s mom, Dawn Brown.

Trey Brown, right, smiles at a fellow teammate while waiting for the action to start on the court.

“It really makes his day that his family came to see him – we’ve got daddy and grandmas and grandpas from both sides – and Joshua and Bart and Frankie and Nick,” Brown adds, referring to Trey’s friends from school. “I was surprised that his general ed classroom got off for the day to come be spectators, too. That was nice they all made posters.”

“It’s really about tolerance, empathy, understanding and opportunity,” Hopkins-Halbert said. “I’ve heard nothing but positives from everybody.”

Penn Yan's orange team celebrates with the trophy and cheers for ALL the Olympians!

Pink Streaks Target Breast Cancer

Jim Blackburn and Rebecca Capek

Several members of the Keuka College community were seen streaking across campus today (Friday, Oct. 25).

Streaking their hair, that is.

And it was for a good cause. The Keuka Against Cancer Club and Women’s Center dedicated the week of Oct. 21-25 to raise awareness of breast cancer.

The highlight of the week was a friendly staff and faculty competition to see who could raise the most money to be donated to the American Cancer Society. The faculty or staff member who raised the most was asked to streak his or her hair pink.

Jim Blackburn, vice president for student development, raised the most money—$81—and not only streaked his hair pink, but also part of his beard.

Jailinne Blanca was one of many students who streaked their hair pink to help raise funds for the American Cancer Society.

In addition to Blackburn, who received breast cancer pins, bracelets, and a t-shirt for his fundraising efforts, other members of the College community donated money to streak their hair pink ($1), or blue, purple, or green ($.50).

“The money we raised, nearly $200, will be sent to the American Cancer Society to help find a cure for breast cancer,” said Rebecca Capek, resident director of Saunders Hall and a Success Advocate. Capek also serves as adviser to the Keuka Against Cancer Club.

Club member Erin Hascup streaks Emmanuel Colon's hair pink.

Other activities included ‘painting’ the campus pink by tying pink ribbons around trees; breast cancer Jeopardy!; a bra toss game; lunch with a breast cancer survivor; breast cancer t-shirt sales; and various give-aways and prizes.

Community Day Celebrates Years of Service, Dedication to Keuka

Fourteen faculty and staff members were recognized for their service and dedication to Keuka College at Community Day Aug. 20.

Lisa Marciniak, President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, and Michael Keck.

Five-year service awards were presented to: Brie Deacon, admissions communications manager, marketing, and web; Judy Jones, library acquisitions clerk; Michael Keck, professor of chemistry and chair of the Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Physical Education; Marlaine “Sparki” Mangles, associate professor of wellness; and Lisa Marciniak, assistant director of international enrollment in the Center for Global Education.

Jim Blackburn, Carol Grover, President Díaz-Herrera, and Stephanie Craig.

Ten-year service awards were presented to: Jim Blackburn, vice president for student development; Carol Grover, controller; and Stephanie Craig, chair, Division of Social Work, and associate professor of social work.

President Díaz-Herrera and Jen Bates.

 

 

 

A 20-year service award was presented to Jennifer Bates, director of financial aid.

A 45-year service award was presented to Sander Diamond, professor of history.

Merit awards were presented to Dale Mosher, sergeant, Office of Campus Safety; Tom Jackson, marketing and administrative manager for traditional admissions; Dawn Chambry, assistant director of development; Michele “Mikki” Sheldon, administrative assistant for the Division of Academic Affairs; and Doreen Hovey, executive assistant to vice president for academic affairs.

President Díaz-Herrera and Joan Magnusen.

President Díaz-Herrera and Janice Folts.

Presidential Awards for Sustained Outstanding Achievement were presented to Joan Magnusen, professor of biology, and Janice Folts, business office coordinator.

Advocating Success

The success advocates include, from left: Margeaux DePrez, Kevin Perry, McKala Accetura, Eugene Mont, Kelsey Deso, Tim White, and Rebecca Capek..

Keuka College has long been touted for its family-like atmosphere.

And a new effort by the Office of Student Affairs just might bring the family even closer, while hopefully having a positive impact on retention. In addition to their regular duties, the College’s seven residence directors (RDs) will become success advocates (SAs) for this year’s new crop of matriculates.

The role of the SAs is to be a friend, another resource on campus to help the students solve problems, and guide them on their path to graduation.

Jim Blackburn, vice president for student development and dean of students.

“We usually hear of unsuccessful students when we can no longer help them,” said Jim Blackburn, vice president for student development and dean of students. “What the success advocates will do is reduce some of the reactivity. We want to be proactive, connect with students right away, and focus on ways that will make each student successful.”

Seen as a front line resource for students, the SAs include RDs Margeaux DePrez (Space Hall), Eugene Mont (Ball Hall), Tim White (Blyley and Harrington Halls), McKala Accetura (Strong Hall Apartments), Kelsey Deso (Davis Hall), Rebecca Capek (Saunders Hall), and Kevin Perry (Keuka Park Apartments). (more…)