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Posts Tagged ‘music’

Audio Feature: A Program of Note, and Notes

The Keuka College music program is on the move.

Kelley Hamilton, music instructor and director of the Chorale, is starting a select choir that will perform at on-campus events and alumni gatherings, and travel for student recruitment.

“It will be a polished, professional group that will showcase the College and give students a high-quality music experience,” said Hamilton,

Hamilton, who has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and other well-known groups, says the spring semester will also bring the formation of a jazz band, private instrumental lessons, and a concert with the Chinese Choral Society of Rochester.

In this interview with Doug Lippincott, executive director of communications and host of Keuka College Today on WFLR (Dundee), Hamilton discusses these initiatives and others, the increased interest in music among students, in particular athletes, and the future of the program.

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Full Steam Ahead for Music Program

With Keuka College’s fall Chorale and Band concert in the books, Kelley Hamilton, music instructor and director of the Chorale, has her sights set on the future of the music program.

And the future starts during the spring 2014 semester, when Hamilton will hold auditions for students who want to join a select choir.

Hamilton envisions the select choir performing at on-campus events, alumni gatherings, and traveling for student recruitment.

“It will be a polished, professional group that will showcase the College and give Keuka students a high-quality music experience,” said Hamilton, who plans to have the choir accompanied by live instrumentalists.

Hamilton, who has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) and other well-known groups, “likes to sing a lot of different genres, and I want to incorporate those genres into the choir.”

With that variety in mind, Hamilton anticipates the choir will sing “mostly pop, R&B, jazz, and Broadway, as well as present some a cappella pieces.”

Chorale member Jakiem Brown ’15, an educational studies major from Rochester, would seem to be a logical candidate for the select choir.

“Many of my best singers and musicians are athletes, and Jakiem is a member of both the men’s volleyball and tennis teams,” said Hamilton. “He plays the saxophone and ukulele, sings, and beat-boxes. He performed a solo during the concert, and is just a great kid who is hungry for more.”

Another athlete who would seem to a logical select choir candidate is Stephanie Havens ’14. The adolescent English major from Unadilla is a forward/midfielder for the women’s soccer team, and has been “singing and playing the trumpet for a long time.

“I liked that I could join Chorale or Band and have private voice lessons,” said Havens. “There is a Mozart piece I am working on that I am excited about, but is nothing I’d have ever considered if not for the voice lessons. I am not afraid to get up and sing in front of people anymore.”

Kelsea Flynn

As the select choir works through its formative stages, the popularity of the Chorale is growing, as evidenced by Kelsea Flynn ’17, a psychology major from Penn Yan. She sang a duet at the concert and “is excited to participate in Chorale next semester.”

“There are a lot of new students registered for Chorale next semester, and I’m excited,” said Hamilton. “There will be some challenges, though. I have several Chinese students registered, and a lot of students can’t read music. But, I hope to incorporate more popular songs into the concerts, and to one day partner with the Arion Players Drama Club and perform a musical.”

Next semester will also bring the formation of a jazz band, private instrumental lessons, and a possible concert with the Chinese Choral Society of Rochester.

“There are many Chinese students in the Keuka College Chorale and I wanted to find an authentic experience for them,” said Hamilton.

Also on tap for next semester will be new music opportunities in the classroom. Hamilton will teach a class on American Music Traditions, which will explore the history of American popular and classical music, including colonial folk music, blues,  jazz, Broadway, rap, and hip hop, among others.

Added Hamilton: “One of the things I hope to do is partner with [Assistant Professor of Art] Melissa Newcomb’s students in her digital photography class and have them design album covers for my students.”

Music by the Lake

Keuka College was the site of a summer music camp conducted by the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, July 14-26.

The camp, designed for middle and high school students, featured a range of classes, as well as master classes, small and large ensembles, and individual instructon in jazz, strings, voice, and guitar. Each program was led by distinguished faculty from the Eastman School of Music and Eastman Community School. Free and open to the public concerts were also staged during the camp. (There is one scheduled Friday, July 26, at 3 p.m. in Norton Chapel),

In this interview on WFLR, Executive Director of Communications Doug Lippincott interviewed students Ciara McCarthy from Stanley, a senior-to-be at Marcus Whitman Central School; Pittsford resident Owen Goettler, a freshman-to-be at Pittsford Sutherland High School; and faculty member Doug Stone.

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Art, Reconfigured

A featured work, "areUaGODDESSofPEACE," which also evokes the tortoise elsewhere in the joint exhibit.

In 1967, theorist Marshall McLuhan published his classic work with its signature theme “the medium is the message.”

Artists Liz Brownell of Victor and Barron Naegel of Rochester see compelling parallels in their own exhibit, which uses a first-generation iPad to introduce viewers to a fusion of old and new technologies and new approaches to art and work.

The exhibit, Reconfiguring Another  Way, runs through March 2 at Lightner Gallery in Lightner Library, with an artists’ reception, open to the public, scheduled Thursday, Feb. 23, from 4:15-6 p.m. The exhibit features many of Naegel’s limited-palette drawings and Brownell’s layered mixed-media designs alongside their signature creation: PORTOISE.

Last year, Naegel and Brownell received a $500 “SOS” grant, or special opportunity stipend, funded through New York State’s Council on the Arts (NYSCA), to purchase a first-generation iPad and other art supplies used in creation of PORTOISE, which is taken from the words “portal” and “tortoise.”

The three-foot wide sculpture, resembling a sea tortoise, houses the iPad, which is programmed with a variety of apps and artistic works conceived by Naegel and Brownell.

“The whole thing is a portal to another dimension of creativity and working,” Naegel explained, “a tongue-in-cheek nod to an old version of silica (clay). New technology is heavily based in ways of working with silica.”

(more…)

What’s New: Traditional Undergrad

Chris Cahill plans to graduate from Keuka College in four years use and use his marketing degree to kick-start his career as a singer-songwriter.

And he doesn’t plan to let his disability get in the way.


Cahill has Tourette Syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive involuntary movements and vocalizations. According to the National Institutes of Health, Tourette Syndrome tics can range from simple anomalies such as repeat blinking, shrugging, grimacing or throat-clearing, to more complex movements or sounds that could include parroted words, phrases or even profanities.

Despite the social trauma this disease can cause, Cahill has been no shrinking violet when it comes to discussing his Tourette Syndrome with fellow students and professors.

“I have talked to all of my professors and a good majority [of my classmates] about it,” he said. (more…)