Skip to content

Posts Tagged ‘nature’

Senior Art Show: Andonucci’s Nature

Natural landscapes are Kat Andonucci’s favorite subject to photograph, her homing beacon. Heading outside to take nature photos remains a comfort, she said.

"Farm" by Kat Andonucci

When she bought her first camera, Andonucci liked “nothing better than capturing a perfect photo, on a perfect day. My goal is always to preserve that moment in time as realistically as possible, sometimes it’s as simple as just taking the photo, while other times it can be much more complex.”

Each work in Andonucci’s senior exhibit, My Nature, which runs through Dec. 13 in Lightner Gallery inside Lightner Library, has some sort of connection to nature, she explained. From Adirondack Park landscapes, to places near Andonucci’s hometown of Chestertown, near Lake George, to locales visited, mountains hiked or even the nature of a human body, the works all carry the theme of nature.

"Cemetery" by Kat Andonucci

In her first photography class at Keuka, when she was originally a biology major, she walked into class with a new digital camera only to discover the course was in black and white film photography. Thankfully, her mother’s old Konica film camera sufficed and Andonucci fell in love with the entire process of taking images from film to print.

The exhibit features numerous black and white film photos, sometimes contrasted with digital ones.

“There is just such a dramatic change between the two, even though the photos are the same,” she described. “Not everything has to be bright and colorful. I enjoy finding the beauty in the odd things, things that people might often overlook or not necessarily consider to be beautiful.” (more…)

Illustrating Elements of Life

As an artist for nearly 30 years, Debra Fisher shares stories – but she shares them in visual narratives, not necessarily written ones.

Among her many multimedia creations are trifold and quad-fold “books,” which can feature any number of colors, drawings, prints, and other artistic details inspired or culled from the pages of her life. Several of Fisher’s “books” and a massive installation work she calls The Waning October Moon are currently on display through Nov. 8 at Keuka College.

Fisher's work, Nocturnal Noise, a "book" she created

The title of the large work is also the title of the exhibit that is featured in the Lightner Gallery, housed in Lightner Library. An artist reception will be held Tuesday, Oct. 23, from 4:30- 6 p.m. Both the reception and exhibit are free and open to the public.

A few years ago, Fisher spent four months in the hospital, and it was not a pleasant experience.

Fisher's Predator Series "book"

“They poke and prod and pull you apart,” said the Spencerport resident who leveraged the experience and turned it into “The Predator Series,” a collection of prints of animals in attack mode. Each print features an inset of images from the classic cookbook “The Joy of Cooking,” which she considers humorous takes on Mother Nature and what people do for food sources.

“Man being preyed upon is the bottom line for that [work,] and myself – the object of investigation,” said Fisher, who has taught printmaking, multimedia and drawing for 13 years at SUNY Brockport. Other prints, drawings, and multimedia creations are also featured in the show.

One of 10 prints that are part of Fisher's installation

It took two days for Fisher to complete the installation of her signature work in the gallery, and visitors will see a wash of antiqued yellow painted directly on the gallery walls, on which she has displayed three-dimensional objects, including 10 individual prints – of a boy, a boat, birds, and more. Each print was created when Fisher etched the selected work onto copper plates, then inked them. Prints were then mounted on wooden frames with hand-marbled paper around the edges, lacquered in a thin coat of beeswax.

Fisher inking scarabs (aka: dung beetles) on a Lightner gallery wall

Fisher calls herself a fan of the alternative print-making process. In addition to copper plating, she teaches gum prints, inking, and stamping. Stamps are part of the signature installation, and across the walls of the installation, visitors will see hand-stamped leaves and scarabs, the term for a dung beetle that some in the Egyptian culture believed offered good luck, or a sign of safe passage to the afterlife.  Perhaps creating a feel as if entering a room, the installation also features a pair of women’s shoes from the 1940s rested atop a small ,three-dimensional staircase, mantel ledges mounted on the walls, and drapings of coffee-colored fabric swaths with prints of birds in flight.

“It’s déjà vu, the sense you’ve been somewhere before, lived this way, the ebb and flow of life situations and experiences you may have,” Fisher said, adding that even the imperfections of the gallery wall, with its nooks and crannies, fit the essence of her work.

Another print, part of the installation

Some of the images of the 10 prints contained within Fisher’s installation are replicas of idyllic landscape images from a print created between 1700 and 1800. Others have been culled from old books, perhaps those with engravings, or from nature. Another print, of a couple’s hands, was pulled from a famous work, “The Wedding,” by Jan Van Eyck, she said.

The Keuka exhibition is the second time Fisher has installed her signature work, and she enjoys discovering how it evolves each time it is recreated.

Fisher preparing one of her prints for display.

“The installation is ongoing … and I [already] have ideas for the next time.  I have some really large bee etchings that will be mounted on thick cardboard and hovering above the wall. I will also include an elaborately framed etching of a dung beetle,” she said, noting she may add a print of her mother to the work. “One response I had from a fellow printmaker and artist was: ‘This could go on forever – you could work on this your whole life.’”

Visitors to the show will have the opportunity to purchase handmade sketchbooks Fisher has created. The covers are crafted with prints from the exhibition and the sketchbooks feature an exposed spine with coptic bindings (ie: chain-stitched by hand). These handmade creations are available for $25.

The gallery is open during library hours, which can be found at: http://lightner.keuka.edu.

Museum Presents Preservation Series July 2, 14, 28

Baby eagle, held by conservationist Mike Allen

The Finger Lakes Museum will present its inaugural program series, “Back from the Brink: The Story of Hemlock and Canadice Lakes,” at Keuka College in three separate installments during the month of July. Part 1 of the series begins with the telling of one of North America’s most fascinating wildlife conservation stories. Parts 2 and 3 complete the chronicle of the lakes’ historic activity and present-day preservation. Each of the programs will be held at Lightner Library.

According to Natalie Payne, associate project director for the Museum, volunteers and professional production specialists invested tremendous effort to put together a high-quality series. As Keuka College neighbors Keuka Lake State Park, the site of the future museum, presenting the series on campus is particularly exciting to Museum project organizers, Payne said.

Bald eagle specialist Mike Allen will speak July 2 at Keuka, with a live bird part of the presentation.

Each “Back from the Brink” presentation is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is requested. Donations are encouraged. For more information or to pre-register, visit www.fingerlakesmuseum.org.  The preservation series moves to Ithaca’s Finger Lakes Wine Center in August.