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Posts Tagged ‘president jorge l díaz-herrera’

Keuka College to Unveil New Turf Field

When Keuka College’s student-athletes arrive for practice, they will lace up their cleats and step on to a bright green field, marked with crisp white, gold, and black lines.

The teams will be among the first to play on the College’s brand new synthetic turf field. Construction on the new facility began in May, and has an anticipated completion date of Aug. 20, just in time for the Fall 2015 sports season. The field, part of the Jephson Community Athletic Complex, features a grey border to outline the playing surface and the signature Keuka College ‘KC’ inlaid at midfield.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held Friday, Sept. 4 to mark the grand opening of the turf field. The ceremony begins at 7 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Following the ceremony, the men’s soccer team take on the Pitt-Bradford Panthers in the Wolfpack’s first game of the 2015-16 season. In addition to the men’s soccer team, the turf field will be used by the College’s women’s soccer squad, men’s and women’s lacrosse teams, and the new field hockey team, whose first home game is Sunday, Sept. 6 at 1 p.m. vs. Ramapo (N.J.) College.

The addition of the turf field is just one part of the College’s on-going long-range strategic plan (LRSP), and will enhance the experience of the College’s student-athletes while helping with enrollment and retention. It also will attract more students to campus by increasing the number of sports offered. The debut of the field hockey team this fall, the 19th sport offered at Keuka, would not be possible without a turf field, said Director of Athletics Dave Sweet.

“Varsity athletics and intramurals plays such a big role in our students’ out-of-classroom experience that it has been recognized by the president and our Board of Trustees, so much so that it became part of our strategic plan,” he said.

According to College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, the turf field will help strengthen the caliber of student-athletes we are able to attract to Keuka College.

“The new turf field will also help retain existing student-athletes as we strive to provide them with the best on-campus experience,” he added.

Sweet said that unlike some turf fields, the new Keuka College turf field can be plowed during the winter for snow removal, a feature that will grant student-athletes earlier access to outdoor practice facilities leading up to the start of the spring sports season.

The field will also boast an enhanced sound system, elevated spectator seating, a full-perimeter fence, a shot clock for lacrosse games, and a paved walkway for access to the field.

Additionally, the College’s intramurals program will make use of the turf field, and Sweet said there is the possibility that Penn Yan Academy—which allowed Keuka to use its turf field over the years—will have access to the new field as well.

For photos of the construction, visit kcwolfpack.com/turf.

Keuka College Receives More Than $160,000 for Energy Conservation Efforts

Robert Schick, chair of the Keuka College Board of Trustees and president of the Lyons National Bank, will accept a $168,351 check on behalf of the College for energy and conversation measures undertaken in campus facilities. He will accept the check during the College’s June 24 Board of Trustees meeting.

The measures are part of a $4 million campus-wide modernization project that will reduce Keuka College’s environmental impact while increasing the productivity and comfort of students, faculty, staff, and guests to the campus. The upgrades will leverage new technology, including LED lighting and adaptive energy management strategies, and ultimately reduce Keuka College’s operational expenses by more than $6 million over 20 years.

As a result of the project’s plans, the College has earned the $168,351 efficiency rebate provided by the New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA).

“Environmental sustainability is an important component of Keuka College’s long-range strategic plan,” said Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, president of Keuka College. “We are committed to investments in sustainable technologies, and this project will reduce the main campus’ carbon footprint by more than 14 percent each year.”

“The 14 percent reduction is equivalent to 709 metric tons of CO2, the same emitted by more than 79,700 gallons of gasoline,” added Jerry Hiller, vice president for finance and administration.

Keuka College’s leadership team evaluated numerous investment options, ultimately selecting the best blend of financial and technical performance. Funding for the project was obtained through a financing program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Development assistance program.

The project will be delivered by Trane and includes new natural gas-fired heating plants to service 12 buildings, several high-efficiency heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) systems, exterior LED lighting, complete renovation of Harrington Hall’s comfort systems and a comprehensive, web-based energy management platform to maximize performance and efficiency.

Murray Receives Keuka College/FLCC Joint Presidential Scholarship

Newark resident Johnathan Murray, assistant director of the One Stop department at Finger Lakes Community College (FLCC) in Canandaigua, received the Keuka College/FLCC Joint Presidential Scholarship at a May 1 reception attended by his FLCC colleagues and representatives from Keuka College.

President Díaz-Herrera, Murray and FLCC President Barbara Risser

The Joint Presidential Scholarship gives an FLCC employee the opportunity to pursue a Keuka College degree tuition-free through an Accelerated Studies for Adults Program (ASAP) cohort meeting for weekly evening classes at FLCC. When one employee completes the major requirements of his or her degree program, another can apply. Murray will begin a program to earn a Master of Science degree in management (MSM) Aug. 27.

He was selected for the award by Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera, president of Keuka College, and Dr. Barbara Risser, president of FLCC. Both were on hand during the presentation, when Murray received a standing ovation.

“I am deeply honored to have been selected for the Keuka College/FLCC Joint Presidential Scholarship, and touched by all the support I have received from my friends and colleagues,” said Murray. “Thank you!”

Keuka College partners with several community colleges across upstate New York to offer ASAP courses at each host campus; some of the partner schools also offer the Joint Presidential Scholarship to their employees. At FLCC, the most recent recipient was Jon VanBlargan, a financial aid counselor who received his Keuka College MSM in 2014. Lynn Freid, director of workforce development for FLCC, received the Joint Presidential Scholarship to pursue a Keuka College bachelor’s degree in organizational management, graduating in 2012. In addition, Mike Fisher, registrar/director of the One Stop department and Murray’s supervisor, received his Keuka College MSM in 2010.

Left to right, Mike Fisher, registrar/director of One Stop, Murray, assistant director of One Stop, and Carol Urbatis, vice president for enrollment management at FLCC.

Murray got his start at FLCC as a student aide at the Wayne County Campus Center in 2003. After earning his associate degree from FLCC in 2005 he went on to receive a bachelor’s degree in business administration/accounting from Rochester Institute of Technology. In 2005, he also became the evening coordinator of FLCC’s Newark facility. He became a One Stop department specialist for FLCC five years ago, and since December 2011, he has served as the One Stop assistant director. In his free time he enjoys bird-watching, digital photography, cooking and baking with friends.

“My work is an important piece of my life,” said Murray. “I enjoy working in higher education and watching students mature and find their passion. The MSM program at Keuka will permit me to improve upon our service to our students and came highly recommended from my peers who have completed the program before me.”

Leadership and service are core components of Keuka College’s MSM program, which was recently ranked as one of the top 50 MSM programs in the country by The Financial Engineer. Candidates are evaluated for admission based on, among other things, their prior academic experience, volunteer and community service history, and leadership potential.

Keuka College’s MSM program is offered at nearly a dozen partner locations across western New York, including GCC’s Batavia campus. The program features a rigorous accelerated format designed for working professionals, allowing them to earn their degree in 18 months. For more information, visit http://asap.keuka.edu/.

Rochester Experts Headline Student Panel Discussion

Taking advantage of the opportunity to pick the brains of two of the top business minds from the Rochester region, Keuka College students turned out in force for a May 1 discussion panel on campus.

Sasson and Rosenberger speak before a packed hall of students May 1.

Rochester residents Steve Sasson, a 35-year Kodak veteran and inventor of the digital camera, along with Geoffrey Rosenberger, a charter school proponent and investment expert met with students prior to the evening’s Fribolin Lecture series at Norton Chapel, a 27-year College tradition where both were featured speakers.

After introductions, M.C. and moderator, College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera opened the floor to questions. And question the students did. The discussion was peppered with students seeking answers to everything from advice on how to ensure future financial security, to what signs indicate an entrepreneurial project is worthy of capital investment, to what factors impact student success at charter schools. Questions on innovation and forecasting technological outcomes were also part of the conversation.

Sasson received several questions surrounding the invention of digital camera technology at Eastman Kodak in the 1970s and whether he ever predicted digital cameras would one day be held in the palm of people’s hands as part of their mobile devices. Sasson drew laughter from students replying that given personal computers had not even been invented when he built the first digital camera at Kodak, no, he had no idea what would ultimately result. In a similar manner, Sasson told students he was also at a loss when asked if he could forecast what invention might replace the digital camera in coming years.

Steve Sasson fields a question from the president.

Sasson outlined the questions and criticisms his invention received in early years and encouraged those in the room that if inventing, they should continue to focus on their project and to plan on hearing naysayers as a matter of routine. In addition, he advised, other inventions will be underway in other parts of the country or world and innovators may later discover an intersection between their invention and someone else’s that makes a giant technological leap forward possible.

Rosenberger replies to a student question.

A staunch advocate of charter schools, with board member service at both Uncommon Schools and True North, Rosenberger ably fielded questions on charter schools. When questioned by an education major how charter renewal cycles could make job security unknown for a teacher, Rosenberger had a quick reply. He far preferred to see that student, as a teacher, with the confidence in her teaching abilities such that she would not fear whether she would still have a job a few years later. Student outcomes fare better when teachers are confident in their work and devoted to the students, he stated firmly.

A student waits to ask a question of the speakers.

Career advice was also factored into the discussion. Sasson urged students to pursue careers that feed their personal passions. Rosenberger described how he hated Friday nights but welcomed Monday mornings and knew when that emotion ceased, it was time to change the work he did. Rosenberger also shared a story of debating his first two job offers as a new college graduate and that he ultimately accepted a lower-paying job where the risk and potential was greater.

Following the panel discussion, Sini Ngobese '15 snaps a selfie with the president using today's digital camera technology., first invented by speaker Steve Sasson.

Following the panel, Sasson and Rosenberger were hosted at a reception at the President’s home and later took the stage at Norton Chapel for individual lectures. The theme of the evening was “Challenging Assumptions: Technology, Education and Innovation.” The lecture series carries the names of Geneva resident Carl Fribolin, an emeritus member of the College’s Board of Trustees and recipient of an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 2004, and his late wife, Fanny.

Keuka College to Commemorate V-E Day May 8

Headline in England's Daily Mail in May 1945

Keuka College will commemorate the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day) Friday, May 8.

The ceremony, free and open to the public, begins at 4 p.m. at the College’s World War II Monument, located near Lightner Library.

College President Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera will deliver remarks along with New York State Assemblyman Phil Palmesano, and Dr. Mike McKenzie, associate professor of philosophy and religion. Rev. Eric Detar, College chaplain, will offer a prayer of remembrance, and Rabbi Ann Landown of Temple Beth-El will recite the Jewish Prayer for the Dead, the Kaddish. Members of the Penn Yan VFW Honor Guard will also take part.

After the ceremony, refreshments will be served in Lightner Library.

V-E Day is celebrated each May 9. It was on this day when the Allies accepted Germany’s Unconditional Surrender in a destroyed Berlin, the German capital. It had been decided at the Casablanca Conference in 1943 that nothing less than the Unconditional Surrender of our foes would be accepted. On May 7, 1945, the Germans surrendered unconditionally at Rheims at the headquarters of the Supreme Allied High Commander, General Dwight Eisenhower.

And Keuka College has a strong connection to the events in Europe nearly 4,000 miles from its idyllic lakeside campus.

When the United States entered the First World War in 1917 two years after the sinking of the Lusitania, some of the young men at Keuka College left school and signed up. Some served stateside while others served on the Western Front or in the Navy. Germany was defeated and signed the Armistice on November 11, 1918. In the 1950s, Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day and every year since the erection of the College’s World War II Monument in May 2005, the College has gathered around our monument to salute all who served in past and current wars.

Dr. Sander Diamond

“On the 50th anniversary of V-E Day in 1995, the students of the Political Science and History Club decided to commemorate this day,” said Dr. Sander A. Diamond, professor of history. “A brass plaque and an oak tree recall that stellar day which included a fly-over by the U.S. Air Force out of Syracuse.”

“Ten years later, the Club erected the World War II Monument on the 60th anniversary of V-E Day,” Dr. Diamond added. “It is well used each Veterans Day, Holocaust Remembrance Day, and Memorial Day. On one side of the Monument, the names of all of the theaters of war are listed; on the other, a salute to our Nursing Cadet Program, setting in stone the connective link between the war and our institutional history. As we did in 1995 and 2005, we honor ‘The Greatest Generation.’”

Twenty-four years after the First World War ended, America was again at war. While Keuka College began its 125-year-old journey as a coeducational institution, it emerged from the First World War as a women’s college. Early in the war, Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of the President, visited our campus and suggested to our president ways the College could contribute to the massive war effort. With so many of the young men from this rural area in uniform, it was suggested that the students could help with the harvests.

New York City's Times Square on V-E Day, May 8, 1945

It was also suggested that the College start a Nursing Cadet Corps Program. Within two years, many of our nursing graduates found themselves in the various theaters of war and some served in the Occupations of Germany and Japan after the war.

“Both the Field Period™ and the nursing program are rooted in the war years, and today are among the central constellations of this fine institution,” said Dr. Diamond.

And according to Dr. Diamond, Keuka College will not be alone in our commemoration.

“World leaders have gathered to commemorate V-E Day and there will be celebrations in Washington, Paris, Brussels, Ottawa, Amsterdam, and Copenhagen,” he said, “We can pride ourselves as an institution that we too have taken time to remember, making another intergenerational transfer of values, which cement the connective links between nations.”