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Posts Tagged ‘professors’

Snapshot of a Graduate: Brian DelPino ’14

Editor’s Note: Where can a Keuka College degree take you? This is the first in a series of snapshot profiles on members of Keuka’s Class of 2014.

Brian DelPino ‘14 of Oneida earned his B.A. in biochemistry and will be heading to graduate school at the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in New York City this fall.

DelPino’s time at Keuka College included competing on the men’s cross-country team where he logged top-five team finishes in five of seven meets, during his junior year. DelPino’s top finishes included running an 8K in 35:08.72 in 2013, and a 6K Invitational race in 29:02.59 in October 2012.

Indoors, DelPino made his mark in the sciences, and for a final Field Period™, he worked with Rebecca Evanicki ’14 and Professor of Chemistry Tom Carroll to set up new high-tech lab equipment and write instruction manuals for state-of-the-art machines added to the third-floor analysis lab in Jephson Science Center over winter break. The four Perkin-Elmer machines enable student researchers to identify unknown substances in minutes when it used to take hours on paper.

DelPino said the biggest benefit of his Keuka College education was the ability to “become close with my professors and have the opportunity to get help or academic advice when I needed it.”

Once in New York City, DelPino plans to study one year in the Touro biomedical sciences program then pursue a Doctor of Osteopathy degree, which he said is similar to an M.D. but based in a different philosophy. Many patients may not realize their doctor actually holds an osteopathy degree, he said.

“I would go there for four years and then apply for a residency position for another couple years of training. I could be a pediatrician, cardiologist, surgeon etc.,” DelPino said. “Ultimately, I would love to specialize in surgery but it is hard to tell if that’s what I will end up doing. In terms a residency, which is after medical school, I am not sure where I will go. It’s a whole process of applying to hospitals and depends on your grades and test scores in medical school, but hopefully, if I put in the same amount of work I have here [at Keuka College], I will get into a competitive residency position.”

To explore what might be in your future with a Keuka College degree, request more information.

Snapshot of a Graduate: Briana June

Editor’s Note: Where can a Keuka degree take you? This is the sixth in a series of snapshot profiles on members of Keuka’s Class of 2013.

Briana June ’13 earned her degree in unified childhood education/special education, with a concentration in American Sign Language (ASL) and a minor in mathematics.

After applying to over 50 schools along the East Coast, including many in New York state, she was offered a position in Upper Marlboro, Md. at Prince George County Public Schools teaching American Sign Language to 6-8th graders in Thomas Johnson Middle School. June said she was initially discouraged that her degree did not seem to be paying off right away.

“I chose to push grad school off for a year to not limit myself to locations for a school in this tough economy. I certainly was lucky to receive this offer!,” she said.

While the job did not spring directly from a Field Period internship or student teaching placement, June said she believed one Field Period at the Cleary School for the Deaf on Long Island, and additional ASL experience factored into the job offer.

June said she valued the hands-on learning gained through her Field Period internships, and the direction she now wants to take her career, even though she is not yet 100 percent sure where she will pursue a master’s degree. She added that the encouragement and one-on-one assistance from professors in both the education and ASL divisions was also beneficial.

“They were always there for individualized help whenever you needed it, even if it was without an appointment, which is big for someone like me who always asks questions. Without the help from my professors always encouraging me and never losing hope in me (even when I did), I definitely would not be where I am today,” June said.

To explore what might be in your future with a Keuka degree, request more information.

Snapshot of a Graduate: Chris Mazella

Where can a Keuka degree take you? This is the eighth in a series of snapshot profiles on members of Keuka’s Class of 2012.

Chris Mazella earned a master’s degree in literacy this spring, after receiving an undergraduate degree last year in adolescent education with concentrations in social studies and special education.

He is now triple-certified in literacy, special education and social studies, a factor that “thoroughly impressed” the hiring principal at Thompson Middle School in Richmond, Va., where he accepted a post as a special education teacher for students in 7th and 8th grades.

Mazella received invitations to interview for different special education posts in five of the schools within the Richmond Public Schools district after attending a March Teacher Recruitment Day event in Rochester. The Depew resident met representatives from Richmond and stayed in contact after the event. Of the five interviews, he netted three job offers from that district.

But if it weren’t for his first Field Period internship as a freshman, Mazella might never have discovered he was a natural in the classroom. With an interest in journalism, Mazella  enrolled at Keuka as an organizational communication major. But his plan to conduct his first Field Period at a newspaper failed to materialize and instead, he found himself exploring the classroom arena.

As they say, the rest is history. He came back to campus, switched his major to adolescent education and never looked back. His work-study supervisor in Keuka’s mailroom was so impressed by the growth she observed over Mazella’s four years that she nominated him for the College’s Experiential Learner of the Year award in 2011.

Mazella said he highly recommends that any student teachers seeking a position out-of-state attend Teacher Recruitment Day, facilitated at Keuka through the Center for Experiential Learning. However, the value of that networking event pales in comparison to “the dedicated faculty that helped us every step of the way,” he said, citing Keuka education professors such as Dr. Andy Beigel, Dr. Pat Pulver, and retired professor Dr. Diane Burke, as well as Dr. Chris Leahy, associate professor of history. Even his student teaching placement supervisor, Thomas Barden of Marcus Whitman High School, helped solidify the kind of teacher Mazella said he hopes to become.

“Without their guidance and support,” said Mazzella,  “I would not be where I am today.”

To explore what might be in your future with a Keuka degree, request more information.