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Posts Tagged ‘recognition’

Senator, Congressman Recognize 125th Anniversary

Keuka College’s 125th birthday drew the attention and admiration of two members of New York’s Congressional delegation.

U.S. Rep. Tom Reed (R-23rd District) recognized Keuka College’s 125th anniversary on the floor of the House of Representatives Oct. 20.

“I ask my colleagues to join me in congratulating Keuka College on 125 years of success,” said Reed. “I am proud to recognize this remarkable milestone and the great contributions the College has made, and will continue to make, to New York’s 23rd Congressional District.”

Reed’s remarks were entered into the Congressional Record, a framed copy of which was presented to President Díaz-Herrera by Mary Green, a member of Reed’s staff, after the Charter Day ceremony Oct. 18.

Mary Green, center, left, presents the plaque, joined by, from left, President Emeritus Dr. Arthur Kirk Jr., Board of Trustees Chair Bob Schick, President Jorge L. Diaz-Herrera, President Emeritus William Boyle Jr., and Provost Paul Forrestell.

The College community also received a congratulatory letter from U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.).

“The ability to change and advance in the field of education is an impressive feat, and I am truly impressed with your dedication to the community and your students,” wrote Gillibrand. “The work that Keuka College has and continues to do for our young people has truly made an impact.”

Seven Keuka College Nurses, Professor Nominated in 2015 “Nurse of the Year” Awards

Seven Keuka College nurses and one nurse education professor have been nominated for the Fifth Annual March of Dimes  “Nurse of the Year” awards gala. The Keuka College nurses will be among the nominees to be recognized Friday, Sept. 18 at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center.

The event honors outstanding nurses from across upstate New York and throughout the Finger Lakes region who have been nominated for their service in some 22 different categories. In past years, the gala has raised more than $75,000 for the March of Dimes, a long-standing, non-profit organization with a mission to improve the health of mothers and babies, prevent birth defects and premature birth and reduce infant mortality.

The following Keuka College nurses have been nominated across several categories:

Nurses can be nominated for the March of Dimes awards by patients, coworkers, friends, family or other health professionals. Last year, five nurses, including Witter, and Dr. Vicki Record, assistant professor of nursing, also received nominations.

“The Nursing Division at Keuka College congratulates the nominees and are proud of their tremendous accomplishments,” said Dr. Debra Gates, chair of the division. “Keuka College nurses are certainly having an impact regionally and seeing nominations each year for these prestigious awards is testament to that. It’s really wonderful that the March of Dimes takes the time to celebrate nurses and the difference they make. We salute all these leaders in the field of nursing.”   

All Business About Medical Service

If Jacob Banas is described as something of an over-achiever, it might be well-deserved. The graduating college senior from Delmar, N.Y., near Albany, decided in the spring of his sophomore year to add a second major —organizational communication—to the English degree he was already pursuing. That meant adding a couple of 18-credit semesters to meet requirements for both degrees.

Then he also decided to start training as an EMT so he could begin volunteering for the Branchport-Keuka Park Fire department. By October of 2013, Banas had started his 160-hours of EMT training, even staying on campus over Winter break to continue four-hour class trainings on Tuesday and Thursday nights, that ran through March 2014.

“My Tuesdays and Thursdays, I would get up for my 8 a.m. class, and not stop till 11 p.m. and maybe be up later with homework,” he recalled. “It’s a miracle I survived that semester.”

But by April 2014, Banas had passed the EMT course —which he dubbed a “First Aid class on steroids”— and could begin volunteering as a first responder on emergency calls. Soon after, Banas also joined the ambulance corps in Penn Yan. More training hours were required and Banas was recently awarded the 2014-15 Yates County award for the most individual training hours in EMT service by any medic for the year. According to Banas, the 185 training hours he logged between 2014 and 2015 does not include his 145 hours on duty or additional volunteer hours with the fire department.

“It’s a surreal moment of closure for me as I’m finishing my time here at Keuka College, to be recognized by so many friends I’ve made at both departments,” he said, calling the award “a really nice recognition.”

Banas now holds basic EMT certification, which means there are limits to what he can do or the medications he can administer. At basic certification level, EMT’s can manage fractures, head/neck or back injuries, motor vehicle accidents, cardiac issues, or allergic reactions. However, basic EMT’s are not licensed to carry narcotics or perform emergency intubations to manually open a patient’s airway as a certified paramedic would be licensed, he said.

Banas said he tries to maintain at least one to two shifts a week at the ambulance corps. “Every now and then, there’s an emergency near the College that the fire department will be called to and I respond in my free time,” he said.

EMT duties can also include driving the rig.

According to Asa Swick, director of operations for the Penn Yan Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Banas is often the first on-scene when an emergency call comes in for an incident on the College campus.

“Often, Jake is already there and he’s been able to assess and start a needed treatment and he knows so many of the staff and students, he’s on a first-name basis with most, and has a good handle how to best help them,” Swick said.

“College students make great responders, they’re looking for stuff to do in a new school, it benefits the community— it’s a win-win all the way around. Students are wonderful to work with because they already want to learn. You’re just providing them another opportunity (for an activity) and a skill they can use for the rest of their lives,” Swick said, noting that Banas’s reputation is “outstanding.”

“Jake is a great medic, gets along with everybody, and fits in really well. He’s told us that if he can find a job in his current field, he’d love to stay and we’d love to see that too. I’d love to have 20 college students that are as active, involved and dedicated as Jake. If I could have 20 Jakes, this community would be in really awesome shape,” Swick said.

Banas snapped this Instagram photo while accompanying a news crew at Albany Medical Center.

And how does Banas see his EMT volunteer service fitting in with his unusual degree? It was just another step along his personal journey to discover his passions, he said. While he could see himself fitting into the medical field, patient care is not the strongest pull. When a friend’s mother suggested he consider hospital management, Banas began incorporating the suggestion into his required Field Period™ experiences.

In the winter of 2015, he conducted a Field Period™ in the PR department of the Albany Medical Center, writing press releases and updating a 60-page crisis communications plan, assisting staff who coordinated media interviews for the physicians and even going into the ER with a news crew to observe a patient’s deep-brain stimulation procedure. The news crew had been following the patient’s treatment for Parkinson’s disease so they were permitted in the operating room without violating patient privacy laws known as HIPPA laws.

Banas in the OR of Albany Medical Center, observing brain surgery.

Then, for spring semester 2015, Banas conducted his 80-hour senior practicum in the Community Services office of Finger Lakes Health in Geneva, so he could get a feel for similar work at a smaller hospital. He assisted staff on wellness programming to teach local schoolchildren better exercise and nutrition habits, ran the social media component of New Visions, an after-school program where high schoolers provide transport and food services to patients, and continued standard PR work writing press releases and maintaining a database of published media clips on Finger Lakes Health.

Between the two hands-on experiences, “it definitely confirmed for me that working in the hospital setting, but maybe not in patient care is where I’d see myself someday,” said Banas, who hopes to pursue a master’s in hospital administration in the future.

Jake Banas and his family celebrate his graduation.

Before graduating with his dual degrees May 23, he accepted a position as Marketing and Visitor Services Assistant at the Finger Lakes Visitors Connection in Canandaigua.

Dr. Anita Chirco, professor of communication, has served as Banas’s academic advisor and said he exemplifies the “can-do, hands-on spirit of a true Keukonian.”

“On top of the countless hours he has put in to succeed at the double majors in English and Organizational Communication, the hours of training and volunteer service he has invested in his EMT work in Keuka Park and Penn Yan have enriched our college and community immeasurably. I am so proud of him,” she said.

Jones Wins Scholarship for Adult Students

Juan Jones, an admissions specialist at Corning Community College (CCC) in Corning, was recently named winner of the Joint Presidential Scholarship. This partnered award from Keuka College and CCC provides a full-time CCC employee a tuition-paid degree through Keuka College’s Accelerated Studies for Adults Program (ASAP). Jones is the sixth recipient of this scholarship award, and plans to begin his education this August.

Jones currently holds an A.S. degree in humanities and social science from CCC and plans to further his education with a B.S. in organizational management from Keuka College. He first started school at the CCC Elmira campus, which used to house a Head Start program. Since then he has spent more than 20 years working with the local Elmira community. Whether it is volunteering at his local library, helping with the Chemung County Head Start program, or volunteering in the Elmira City School District. Jones looks forward to using the new skills he’ll gain by acquiring a higher education.

Kimberly Morgan, director of admissions for ASAP, said that Jones is held in such high regard “it was like he was the mayor,” and at least 20 people came to the ceremony to honor his achievement.

Embodying the ideal of service and giving back, Jones is planning on using the scholarship to better serve his community and said he was “truly honored” to receive it.

President of CCC Dr. Katherine P. Douglas, Recipient Juan Jones, President of Keuka College Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera

The B.S. in organizational management program at Keuka College features an accelerated format; students attend class one night a week and complete their degree requirements in less than two years.

Keuka College offers seven degree programs through ASAP: four bachelor’s degree programs (criminal justice systems, nursing, organizational management, and social work) and three master’s degree programs (criminal justice administration, management, and nursing). Classes are offered at some 20 locations in New York State, including Corning Community College.

For more information on ASAP, contact the Center for Professional Studies at 866-255-3852 or

From ‘Big Boom Boy’ to Professor of the Year

Mike Rogoff’s college career got off to an inauspicious start.

He blew up the chemistry lab at Hofstra University.

“I started my college career as a pre-med major because I planned to become a psychiatrist,” explained Rogoff, Keuka College’s 2012-13 Professor of the Year who delivered the keynote address at academic convocation today (Aug. 27). “Things went pretty well in my biology courses, but chemistry was another story. I was barely making it through chemistry lecture with a D- average but the big problem came when I blew up the chemistry lab.”

No one was hurt, but “‘Big Boom Boy’ got bounced from pre-med,” recalled Rogoff.

But then he “bounced back.” Rogoff changed his major to psychology and the rest is history.

“It’s great if you start with a major that fits you right away and you stay with it throughout college,” said Rogoff, who joined Keuka faculty in 1971, “but don’t feel like a failure if your first major just doesn’t fit your talents and interests. These changes help you build your personal and professional identity. They help you find out who you are, what you’re good at, and what you really want to do.”

Rogoff credited one of his teachers (Dr. Vane) and adviser (Dr. Cohen) for helping him “grow into my new major” and building his “confidence as a learner.

“I needed that support,” he said. “I didn’t feel good about myself when I bombed out of pre-med. As a matter of fact, I felt downright stupid. But my adviser helped me flip things around. He reminded me that I had done pretty well in my biology courses even though I had a hard time in chemistry.”

According to Rogoff, he also got a lot of support from the upperclass psychology majors, and by the time he finished at Hofstra, he was on the Dean’s List and admitted to all seven of the graduate schools to which he applied.

“Not too shabby for the ‘Big Boom Boy,’” quipped Rogoff, who holds master’s and doctoral degrees from Cornell University.

Said Rogoff: “My main message here is that you’ll have the same opportunities as you grow into your career. Here at Keuka, you’ll have access to many circles of support and that will help you continue to develop your competencies and interests. You’ll continue to gain insight into who you are, what you can do, and what you want to do.

“Let us help you accomplish your dream,” added Rogoff. “Let us help you develop your competencies, and let us help you build your support and bounce-back skills. Increasingly, you’ll be able to put into place the circles of support. You’ll be able to help others build resilience. All of this can help make the world a better place.”

Academic convocation marked the official opening of the 2013-14 academic year and College President Dr. Jorge L. Díaz-Herrera and Robert Schick, chair of the Board of Trustees, welcomed new students to campus.

Schick urged the students to get involved.

“Make a new friend every day: another student, faculty member, any of the staff of the College. Immerse yourself into the very fabric of the College by joining clubs and participating in sports as a participant or fan.”

Friendship was also on the president’s mind. He told the students they could “expect to make plenty of friends, many of who will become lifelong friends. You can definitely expect to make memories that will last a lifetime.”

He also said they can expect to make a difference—both on campus and in the larger community.

“Community service at Keuka is important,” he said. “Last year alone, our students devoted more than 60,000 hours of service.”

More photos of Academic Convocation.