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Posts Tagged ‘social work’

Snapshot of a Graduate: Nakita Simons ’14

Editor’s Note: Where can a Keuka College degree take you? This is the sixth in a series of snapshot profiles on members of Keuka’s Class of 2014.

Simons, left and fellow social work graduate.

Nakita Simons ’14 of Prattsburgh began a new job May 27 as a foster care caseworker for Steuben County Department of Social Services (DSS). The Prattsburgh resident first truly explored the social work field when she conducted her sophomore Field Period™ with DSS and had “a great experience,” Simons said.

The work went so well Simons applied for a high-profile BSW Child Welfare Scholarship from New York’s Social Work Education Consortium in her junior year. Winners of the scholarship are essentially guaranteed a two-year job as a child welfare caseworker with a county DSS agency and can also earn additional scholarship money for a master’s degree in social work, provided all goes well in a semester-long practicum during their senior year. Thanks to her 3.9 GPA and her record of stellar service in multiple volunteer and leadership roles outside the classroom, Simons not only landed the scholarship and job with Steuben County DSS but was named one of six student Social Workers of the Year for the Genesee Valley Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). She will be pursuing her MSW online through a program offered by Fordham University.

Simons said she found the College social work program faculty “really helped me to get the most out of my education. They were supportive and encouraging. They got to know you on a personal level and helped me to discover my passion and reach the goals I set for myself.”

To explore what might be in your future with a Keuka College degree, request more information.

Simons a Social Work Success

At the heart of social work is service to others, and in that dimension, Keuka College senior Nakita Simons sets the standard.

Simons, left, with Brenda Barkley, Chair of the NASW Genesee Valley Division chapter

Praised as a natural-born leader, the Prattsburgh resident and social work major coordinates so many special projects for non-profit agencies and organizations between home and school that it can be hard to keep them all straight. For her multitude of service, Simons was recently named one of six student Social Workers of the Year at a regional chapter event for the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). The NASW award recognizes social work students in the New York State Chapter’s Genesee Valley Division who have made significant contributions in the field.

According to Stephanie Craig, associate professor of social work and chair of the College Division of Social Work, Simons “is versatile, dedicated and one of the most diligent new social workers to enter this field. She’s got a lot of social work insight that has just really blossomed and developed through her experience here.”

Just how much does Simons serve? Well, she delivers holiday food baskets for the needy and serves at a bake sale fundraiser for the Howard Union Church. She coordinates Christmas gift deliveries through the Angel Tree project and runs twice-monthly volunteer support at Milly’s Pantry in Penn Yan for the College’s Association of Future Social Workers (ASFW) chapter. The ASFW members also host an annual Hunger Banquet to raise awareness of poverty, and assist the Branchport-Keuka Park Fire Department with their annual Halloween party for local children.

Simons, in white, with her NSO "mentees"

As president of Phi Alpha Theta, the College honors society for social work students, Simons coordinates all fundraising and community service work for the group. The newest venture, slated for April, will be conducting service work on behalf of veterans at the Bath VA Medical Center, she said. Back on campus, Phi Theta Alpha has also given a presentation on veterans’ issues, including mental illness, homeless rates, and other needs. In addition, Simons has served three years as a New Student Orientation (NSO) mentor, logging extra hours on her own to take new freshmen under her wing and show them skills for success.

In addition, Simons, who also served as a biology tutor, maintains a 3.9 grade point average, said Craig who attended the NASW awards banquet with Simons last week.

And the NASW award is not the only one. Simons boasts another prestigious accomplishment: earning a BSW Child Welfare Scholarship from New York’s Social Work Education Consortium. The scholarship carries a two-year employment contract as a child welfare caseworker with a county Department of Social Services agency and the possibility of earning additional scholarship money for a master’s degree in social work, provided all goes well in an initial semester-long practicum. But once again, Simons stands apart. (more…)

Helping Children Find Their Voice

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series of features on recipients of the Judith Oliver Brown Memorial Award. The award, named after the late 1963 Keuka graduate, is supported by Brown’s family and the Class of ’63. It is designed to assist students pursuing a culturally-oriented Field Period™.

Stephanie Taylor, a resident of Huguenot, finds inspiration in “Speak Out,” a poem by Australian author Stacey Blevins.

That is fitting, as the social work major traveled to Sydney, Australia for her January Field Period™. A recipient of the Judith Oliver Brown Memorial Scholarship, Taylor worked at St. Saviours Anglicare, a home for children up to age 17 who have experienced trauma or abuse.

In “Speak Out,” Blevins writes “the power of one voice can change the world,” and Taylor said the poem “strikes a meaningful point to think about; the change you make may not be what’s considered exceptionally massive, but that speaking out can still create a critical and monumental difference. The poem reflects on my personal and professional growth as a senior at Keuka College, and as a future social worker.”

Taylor may have found her voice, and she wanted to use it to help others who might not have their own—particularly children. During her Field Period™ at St. Saviours Anglicare, Taylor observed case management with foster-care professionals in placing troubled youth, touring other agencies, meeting with professionals, and discovering what services are provided. She lived and worked with Julianne Panayi, a social worker at St. Saviours.

“Additionally, I was in Australia during one of Sydney’s largest events, known as the Sydney Festival, that’s full of talent, community, and culture,” said Taylor. “I also assisted Mrs. Panayi in preparing for Australia Day held Jan. 26, the day that Australia was founded as a colony, and is the country’s biggest day of celebration.” (more…)

Meet New Faculty: Social Work, Spanish, and Child and Family Studies

Editor’s Note: This is the second in a two-part series of Q&As with new, full-time faculty members.

Kevin Murphy of Elmira, assistant professor of social work, is teaching traditional and ASAP courses this fall, including Social Welfare Policy and Service I & II, Ethics and Diversity in Social Work, and Generalist Social Work Practice I. Come spring, he is scheduled to teach Group Processes I & II, Social Work Research Methods, Generalist Social Work Practice I & II, and Social Welfare Policy & Service I. 

Last book read: Dr. Sleep, by Stephen King.

Favorite quote: Non decor deco (Latin for “I am not led, I lead.”)

If you could be a fictional character, who would you be and why? No one. I like my real life too much.

What makes teaching fun? Seeing the passion the students bring to the table, and being privileged enough to be a part of their transformational journey.

What do you do for fun? Time with the wife and kids, campfires in my backyard on weekends, reading, writing, and obstacle course racing.

 

Guadalupe Morales-Gotsch, visiting assistant professor of Spanish, is teaching Intercultural Studies, Introduction to Spanish, Spanish for Communication, and Latin American Short Stories.

Last book read: Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

Favorite quote: “It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge,” by Albert Einstein.

If you could be a fictional character, who would you be and why? Dora the Explorer, because she loves to engage herself with new friends and situations, making the best of those situations and her new friends.

What makes teaching fun? Students and their desire to learn.

What do you do for fun? Travel, meet new people and learn about their culture, reading for pleasure

Nicholas Koberstein

Nicholas Koberstein, instructor of child and family studies, teaches Introduction to Human Development, Development in Middle Childhood, and Psychology of Adulthood and the Aging.

Last book read: 
Go Dog Go, by P.D. Eastman. My daughter, Harper and son, Wyatt, read every night before bedtime. Go Dog Go is a great book that helps them develop skills in language, learn colors, numbers, and orientations, all with some subtle humor. It is a mainstay on our bedtime bookshelf.

Favorite quote: “My most brilliant achievement was my ability to be able to persuade my wife to marry me,” by Winston Churchill.  My wife, Kristen, is the cornerstone of our family. I have never met a more gorgeous, intelligent, kind-hearted, and hard-working woman.

If you could be a fictional character, who would you be and why? Indiana Jones, the ultimate renaissance man. If nothing more than to have some flashy, three-piece tweed suits. Jones lives a fascinating life of exploration and adventure. He always escapes danger and fights for what is right and just.

What makes teaching fun? Influence. To make a positive change in a student’s life or to teach them something that changes their world view. Learning is an experience that is more than the information that is taught in the classroom. It is a culture that is co-created and shared by the students. Every new class is a different than the last.

What do you do for fun? I love to explore with my family. Every weekend my family and I try to experience something new. Since we moved to the area in August from Connecticut, there is plenty of exploring to do.

Betty Morris-Mitchell, Assistant Professor of Social Work in the Accelerated Studies for Adults (ASAP) program, is teaching Social Work Practice III (SWK 351) & Social Welfare Policy & Services II (SWK 401).

Last book read: The Good Dream by Donna VanLiere

Favorite quote: Character is found in how you treat people who can’t do anything for you.

If you could be a fictional character, who would you be, and why?: I would be Ivorie from the book, The Good Dream. Ivorie, a single woman, rescues and raises an abused young child despite talk and opposition from members of the community.

What makes teaching fun: Helping students achieve their God-given dreams; helping them to understand that they were created to soar.

What do you do for fun?  I read.  I enjoy reading fiction, non-fiction, self-improvement books, and biographies.   I also write short-stories when I have the time.

 

 

Meet New Faculty: Political Science, OT, and Social Work

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series of Q&As with new, full-time faculty members. Today, meet three of Keuka’s new additions.

David Pak Leon

Dr. David Pak Leon, assistant professor of political science, teaches International Relations, Political Development in Asia, and Globalization.

Last book read: Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty, by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson.

Favorite quote: “Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past,” by George Orwell.

If you could be a fictional character, who would be and why? I can’t really think of a fictional character that I would like to be.

What makes teaching fun? It is always fun and interesting when I see students grow in knowledge throughout a semester. I enjoy lively discussions in and outside the classroom when different perspectives are presented. It is also nice when students tell me what they are learning and reading on their own, or when they bring in relevant outside materials or their own experiences that enrich our collective understanding of different issues. Seeing eager and engaged students makes teaching rewarding.

What do you do for fun? I enjoy listening to music and reading (politics, history, architecture, economics, and finance). I like browsing bookstores and antique shops, and biking.

 

Sunny Winstead of Burdett, N.Y., assistant professor of occupational therapy, is teaching classes in occupational therapy assessment and intervention for older adults.

Sunny Winstead

Last book read: Other than a textbook? Maybe a Ruth Rendell mystery, but unfortunately it’s been awhile!

Favorite quote: You’ll never be sorry for taking the high road.

If you could be a fictional character, who would you be, and why? Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter books. She’s smart, inventive, and brave. Plus, I’d love to have a Time-Turner so I could be in two places at once!

What makes teaching fun? Collaborating with students and seeing their confidence grow as they move toward clinical practice.

What do you do for fun? I enjoy spending time with my family, reading, gardening, and hiking.

 

Dr. Jason McKinney of Penfield, assistant professor of social work, is teaching a number of classes this year, including Youth Services Delivery, Research Methods, Ethics and Diversity, and Field Practicum.

Jason McKinney

Last book read: Eat and Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness, by Scott Jurek.

Favorite quote: “Be the change you wish to see in the world,”  Mahatma Gandhi

If you could be a fictional character, who would you be, and why?:Cookie Monster. I wish I could eat junk food all day and never gain a pound!

What makes teaching fun? Students make teaching fun! I love the interactive part of teaching, such as class discussion or learning activities designed to connect theory and practice. 

What do you do for fun? I play guitar, ukulele, and percussion. I run, garden, lift weights, and study Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

Coming Monday: Three more Q&A profiles of new, full-time faculty members.