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Swapping Suntans for Social Responsibility

Painting fences on a farm that teaches farming skills to men rehabilitating from drugs and alcohol doesn’t sound like a typical activity for college students on spring break.

Neither does working at a home for boys, from 8-18 years old, teaching them English and playing volleyball, basketball, Frisbee, and soccer with them.

But that is just what a dozen Keuka College students will do as part of the College’s annual Alternative Spring Break when they travel to Quesada, Costa Rica March 20-27. These students will not be working on their suntans. They will simply be working—hard.

Hosted by Mary Curtiss Miller ’53 and her husband Ralph, and led by Rev. Eric Detar, Keuka College chaplain and director of the Center for Spiritual Life, and Tim White, assistant director of residential life and director of the Success Advocates, the students are part of Alternative Spring Break’s first international edition. The Millers have been missionaries in Costa Rica for more than 50 years.

“When Tim and I first began leading Alternative Spring Break trips four years ago, they were seemingly random, but we always found someone, and some way, to help,” said Detar. “We are beginning to become more strategic in our trips, and we want to offer four unique experiences throughout a student’s years at Keuka College. We hope to offer trips in an urban setting, an environmental setting, a rural setting, and an international trip. During each trip, we will look at culture, stewardship, and poverty of each area we visit.”

Junior Faith Garlington is particularly excited about working at the home for boys.

“As an occupational science major, I am interested to see the differences between how the boys play as to how kids in America play,” said Garlington, a Boonville resident. “I want to see how and when they reach their milestones in a culture that is different from mine. I am excited to connect what I have learned in the classroom with what I will see.”

Katie Crossley, a sophomore unified early childhood education major from Panama, N.Y. chose to participate in Alternative Spring Break because she believes she felt “a calling to go and is exactly where I am supposed to be in my life right now,” while Bloomfield resident Jeff Miller says he wants to reorient himself.

“It’s so easy to get caught up in your own world and forget that we are more fortunate than a lot of others in the world,” said the junior occupational science major. “I am grateful for what I have.”

For Lindsay Holmes, a senior occupational science major from West Henrietta, this is her second Alternative Spring Break trip.

“I went on the trip to Washington, DC last year, and experienced the culture of the homeless; it was eye-opening,” she said. “I think this will be similar, but on a larger scale.”

Emily Grecco, a sophomore psychology major from Waverly and Haley Jordan, a junior occupational science major from Auburn, agree that participating in Alternative Spring Break will be a reality check.

“I will be helping people with something they need, and not just be on another vacation where I am a tourist,” said Grecco.

“It’s easy to think that that one person can’t have much of an impact, but we’ve seen from past trips that it’s not true. I am so glad that I will not be a tourist and that I will get to interact with the people on a greater level,” said White.

While the students will not be tourists, they will be able to explore the country through activities such as speeding down a zip line, go horseback riding, swimming in the hot springs of Arenal Volcano, and visiting Sarchi, a quaint painted oxcart village. The group will also participate in worship services at a Methodist Church.

Other students participating include: Emily Pidgeon, a junior social work major from Oneonta; Rachel Guthrie, a junior child and family studies major from North Rose; Ashley Terry, a sophomore political science and history major from Andes; Emily Black, a sophomore political science and history major from Athens, Pa.; Jenny Schafer, a junior occupational science major from Fayetteville; and Patricia Wallace, a senior occupational science major from Bath.

No Beaches for this Bunch

Jamaica, Miami, South Padre Island, and Puerto Vallarta are among the Travel Channel’s Top 12 spring break destinations for college students this year.

A destination notably missing is Washington, D.C., probably due to its lack of palm trees and white sand beaches.

But a dozen Keuka College students, who chose to swap suntans for shovels, will travel to the nation’s capital April 1-6 to spend spring break helping those in need. The students, along with Eric Detar, College chaplain, and Tim White, resident director for Blyley and Harrington Halls and a retention counselor, are participating in Keuka College’s annual Alternative Spring Break.

The Keuka team will work with the Center for Student Missions (CSM), which provides urban missions and service experiences for youth, adult, and family groups.

While working in Washington, the Keuka students will prepare and serve breakfast and lunch to the homeless, assist with an after-school program for elementary school children, help with the construction and renovation of a church, and assist at a senior center day care program.

“Right now, we just know each other by name and maybe a couple of other things,” said Detar. “The students who choose to take Alternative Spring Break trips will have a unique shared group experience that no one else will have. By the end of this trip, each of us will be much more than just a face around campus.”

Courtney Ray, a junior social work major from Cato, believes the trip will be an eye-opening experience.

“As a social work major, I anticipate working with the kind of people I will work with in my career,” she said.

Kaysie Burnett, a junior education major from Shortsville, wanted to go on the Alternative Spring Break “because I have never been to Washington, D.C., and thought a service trip would be a good way to spend spring break.”

And while participating in a mission trip may be new to Burnett, helping others is in Nina Fusco’s blood. The freshman occupational science major has been practicing social responsibility through her church since she was 13. But since her church closed several months ago, the Mechanicsville resident has been looking for a service project. So, when she heard about the Alternative Spring Break trip, Fusco jumped at the chance.

“Participating in this trip lets me continue doing something I love to do, and I am looking forward to going,” said Fusco.

So are Penn Yan resident Alicia Parkhurst, who is pursuing her master’s degree in education, and junior Francesca Spina.

Two years ago, Spina, an adolescent social studies major, worked with nine other students at Franciscans for the Poor in Cincinnati, Ohio, for the 2011 edition of Alternative Spring Break.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the trip and it changed my perspective on my life,” said the Rochester resident. “It made me realize how blessed I am and how much I can give to others in need. That is way I want to go to Washington and help again.”

After the students have performed the day’s work, they will have an opportunity for reflection at the Douglas Memorial Methodist Church, and enjoy dinners at ethnic restaurants. Also planned are   visits to the National Mall, Lincoln Memorial, World War II Memorial, Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

White expects the Keuka group to be impacted by what they see and do while in Washington.

“The work we will do has been going on for a long time, and will continue after we leave,” said White. “We will get a snapshot of what people do every day to help those who need it most. What we get from this trip will be far more that what we give.”

Other students participating in Alternative Spring Break include: Robby Magee, a senior adolescent social studies/special education major from Fairport; Megan Russo, a freshman psychology major from Ceaderville, N.J.; Mattie Waldstein, a senior education studies major from Needham, Mass.; Patricia Wallace, a junior occupational science major from Bath; Lindsay Holmes, a junior occupational science major from West Henrietta; Sean Boutin, a sophomore criminology/criminal justice major from Purling; and Niki Chase, a junior social work major from Oneonta.

Nuns, Crayons, and Music Men

Members of the student affairs staff were in the Halloween spirit as they captured first place with their box of crayons group costume.

What do a box of crayons, a bag of pepperoni, Flo of Progressive Insurance fame, a prom-going zombie, the Ball Hall tower, and a fox have in common?

Ariel Scott

They were all characters who won the annual Halloween costume contest held on the Keuka College campus Wednesday, Oct. 31.

Tracy McFarland, associate vice president for student development, portrayed the crayon box, while Eva Moberg-Sarver, director of student activities; Eric Detar, chaplain; and resident directors (RD) Kevin Perry, Tim White, Rebecca Capek, Margeaux DePrez, and Kelsey Deso posed as the crayons.

McFarland and her colorful crew earned first place in the group category.

Amanda Burlingame

Junior Ariel Scott (zombie), an organizational communication major from Unadilla, received the top prize in the scariest category, while the most original prize went to Amanda Burlingame, a senior adolescent mathematics/special education major from Keuka Park, for her portrayal as Flo.

Nathan Calabria

Jennie Snyder

The top costumes in the male and female categories went to Nathan Calabria (the fox), and Jennie Snyder (pepperoni). Calabria and Snyder, part of the D.R.I.V.E. program, earned $30 each for their efforts.

Sue DeLyser

For staff and faculty, a Halloween hat contest with desk-to-desk competition, was held. Human Resources Manager Sue Delyser, earned bragging rights with her ‘hat’—the Ball Hall tower.

Each contestant received a gift certificate to the Terrace Café courtesy of AVI Fresh, the College’s food service provider.

More Halloween photos.

College Marks 9/11 Anniversary

College Chaplain Eric Detar lights a candle at the College's 9/11 remembrance service.

Keuka College marked the 11th anniversary of 9/11  with a candle-lighting and bell-ringing ceremony at the September 11 Memorial Tree outside Dahlstrom Student Center.

At each time a plane crashed Sept. 11, 2001—8:45 a.m. (North Tower of the World Trade Center); 9:03 a.m. (South Tower of the World Trade Center); 9:43 a.m. (Pentagon); and 10:10 a.m. (Somerset County, Pa.)—the bells in the Ball Hall bell tower rang, and a candle was lit at the base of the tree.

“While it is important never to forget what happened on Sept. 11, 2001, you must also find a way to heal and move on with your life,” said College Chaplain Rev. Eric Detar.

Detar was “touched by the number of people at the service last year, and the number of people personally affected by the tragedy. I listened to the stories students, faculty, and staff told of the people they knew who were in the towers, or who should have been there, but for some reason, were not.”

Before coming to Keuka in 2009, Detar served as associate pastor at Grace United Methodist Church in Indiana, Pa., and fulfilled the role of campus minister to the students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP).

“The Shanksville field, where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed, is about 45 minutes away from Grace United, and we had a camp—Camp Allegany—that backs up to that field,” said Detar. “Camp Allegany was turned into a place where workers stayed and people received help. Tim [White, residence director for Blyley and Harrington Halls] and I have been to the field, and it seems to me that the people on that plane chose that spot specifically in hopes of saving lives on the ground.”

The tree, planted last year to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the attacks, also held a vase with one red, one blue, and one white carnation. A plaque by the base of tree reads: “To honor and remember the victims, emergency personnel, and other heroes who died in the attacks on our country.”

Advocating Success

The success advocates include, from left: Margeaux DePrez, Kevin Perry, McKala Accetura, Eugene Mont, Kelsey Deso, Tim White, and Rebecca Capek..

Keuka College has long been touted for its family-like atmosphere.

And a new effort by the Office of Student Affairs just might bring the family even closer, while hopefully having a positive impact on retention. In addition to their regular duties, the College’s seven residence directors (RDs) will become success advocates (SAs) for this year’s new crop of matriculates.

The role of the SAs is to be a friend, another resource on campus to help the students solve problems, and guide them on their path to graduation.

Jim Blackburn, vice president for student development and dean of students.

“We usually hear of unsuccessful students when we can no longer help them,” said Jim Blackburn, vice president for student development and dean of students. “What the success advocates will do is reduce some of the reactivity. We want to be proactive, connect with students right away, and focus on ways that will make each student successful.”

Seen as a front line resource for students, the SAs include RDs Margeaux DePrez (Space Hall), Eugene Mont (Ball Hall), Tim White (Blyley and Harrington Halls), McKala Accetura (Strong Hall Apartments), Kelsey Deso (Davis Hall), Rebecca Capek (Saunders Hall), and Kevin Perry (Keuka Park Apartments). (more…)